Showing posts with label - - Shrines jinja - -. Show all posts
Showing posts with label - - Shrines jinja - -. Show all posts

9/12/2017

Onishi Demon Rock

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. Onipedia - 鬼ペディア - Oni Demons - ABC-List - .
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onishi (oni-ishi, oniishi) 鬼石の鬼伝説 
Onishi Demon Stone Legends / "ogre stone"


There are various places, Onishi and Oniishi, in Japan.

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Gunma, Fujioka town 群馬県藤岡市
Onishi 鬼石町 Onishi-machi was a town located in Tano District, Gunma Prefecture.
鬼石町(おにしまち)は群馬県多野郡にあった町。
On January 1, 2006, Onishi was merged into the expanded city of Fujioka.



Oni no Ishimaru 鬼の石丸
He is the symbol of the shopping arcade and appears at the Setsubun rituals.

Onishi Jinja 鬼石神社 Onishi Shrine in Onishi village





The region produced many stones 石の産地.
The protector deity of stones was called 鬼石明神 Onishi Myojin and is known at least since 1703.

- - - - - A legend from Onishi village
Daibagami (daibakami) だいば神 / 大馬神 is a strange illness of horses.
All of a sudden the hind legs can not move any more and soon after the animal dies.
This disease only occurs from April to August.

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- quote -
Shiro Oni Studio: Artist in Residency Program シロオニスタジオ "White Demon"
Our program introduces artists to the Japanese countryside. We offer private studios, opportunities to work with the surrounding community,
Away from the congested urban life of Japan and surrounded by mountains in the small town of Onishi (ogre stone) in Gunma prefecture, artists can work free from outside distractions. Shiro Oni Studio's first priority is to provide each artist with individual studio space to focus on their work.
- reference source : shirooni.com... -


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Oniishi 鬼石 - Beppu Hot Spring, Oita 別府 大分県

- quote -
Oniishi Bozu Jigoku 鬼石坊主地獄


Gray thermal mud at boiling temperature looks like the bald head of a boozu or a Buddhist monk.
It is located next to the Umi-jigoku. There are also foot bath and onsen inside the area.
- - - - - Oniishi-bozu-jigoku Ashiyu Footbath
It’s clean and comfortable. The hot water also retains heat.
- source : english.beppu-navi.jp... -




Nearby is the hot-spring hotel Oniishi no Yu 鬼石の湯.


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. Japanese Legends - 伝説 民話 昔話 – ABC-List .


............................................................................ Aomori 青森県
むつ市 Mutsu town

. sanzubashi 三途橋 Bridge over the river Sanzu at Osorezan .



............................................................................ Mie 三重県
鈴鹿峠 Suzuka toge pass

. Onigakiba 鬼ヶ牙 "Demon Fang Stone" .
臼石?杵石? and onisurusuishi 鬼臼石 / オニスルスイシ Oni Surusu Ishi mortar stone


............................................................................ Miyagi 宮城県
刈田郡 Katta district 蔵王町 Zao

At the foot of Mount Zao there lived a sanki 山鬼 mountain Oni who grabbed humans and ate them.
The Oni eventually turned to stone and the place is now called
鬼石原 Oniishihara
Oniishihara Tōgatta onsen, Zaō-machi, Katta-gun, Miyagi

. sanki 山鬼の鬼伝説 Mountain Oni Demon Legends .


............................................................................ Nagano 長野県
小県郡 Chiisagata district

The story about the onishi 鬼石 Oni Rock in 東内村 Higashi-Uchimura.
Around 1916 a new road was to be built and this stone had to be moved. Below it a huge kyuushi 臼歯 molar, bigger that that of a horse or bull, was found.
People thought it was oni no ha 鬼の歯 the tooth of an Oni.

. oni no ha 鬼の歯 teeth of an oni / kiba 牙 fangs .

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茅野市 Chino town

The mountain range of Tateshina 立科山麓 and the name of CHINO.
Near 北山村 Kitayama village there is a stone with 鬼の足形 the footprint of an Oni, called 鬼石 Oniishi.
Where the Oni was driven out is a place called 鬼場 Oniba, and where his blood came down the river is
Chino 血野 "bloody field".
Where the Oni was burned and the ashes scattered around is now 灰原田 Haibarata.

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北安曇郡 Kita-Azumi district 白馬村 Hakuba

At the pass 佐野坂峠 Sanosaka Toge there is a Demon Stone.
It has been touched by an Oni and to our day shows the marks of his hands.

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- reference : nichibun yokai database 妖怪データベース -


- reference - 鬼石 -

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. - - - Join the Onipedia friends on facebook ! - - - .

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. Onipedia - 鬼ペディア - Oni Demons - ABC-List - .

. Tengu 天狗と伝説 Tengu legends "Long-nosed Goblin" .

. - yookai, yōkai 妖怪 Yokai monsters - .

. Legends and Tales from Japan 伝説 - Introduction .

. Mingei 民芸 Regional Folk Art from Japan .

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8/06/2017

Shinto and Oni

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. Onipedia - 鬼ペディア - Oni Demons - ABC-List - .
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Shinto and Oni Demons 神道と鬼

. kami 神 Shinto deities / Japanese gods .
kami to oni 神と鬼 the Deities and Demons of Japan

. torii no oniko 鳥居の鬼コ Demons of the Shinto Toorii gates .
..... 鬼子 - also read as kishi and onigo

. jinja - list of Shinto shrines with ONI . *


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- quote -
Oni
A misshapen supernatural demon or devil visiting this world from the other world, bringing with it disaster or blessing. Due to their fearful spiritual power, oni were considered ambivalent beings possessing the power of both good and evil, and were thus the objects of both worship and avoidance. While the character for oni was read in China as gui and referred to the soul of a deceased person, it was read in Japan variously as oni (demon), mono (an indwelling spirit), or kami.

Based on the salient characteristics of beliefs about oni, the concept of oni can be classified into three main types:
(1) wicked spirits or evil kami,
(2) oni as foreigners or strangers, and
(3) oni as good kami.
The first type bring disaster, death, and plague, and initially were considered invisible beings, but later came to have visible forms. The Nihongi notes the practice of using peaches to ward off oni, a reflection of Chinese beliefs that peaches possessed the power to control noxious spirits and demons. Other expressions found include ashikimono ("evil spirits") and matsurowanukami ("unruly kami"), terms which are believed to refer to evil kami or the tutelaries of people who opposed kingly authority in ancient times.

In contrast, the Nihon ryōiki relate incidents of demons (mono) which caused insanity, and the "evil spirit of a slave" (ashiki yatsu no reiki) which caused death. In short, such expressions referred to departed spirits which had become oni and brought curses upon those still living. Such oni were believed to be the spirits of persons who carried resentments or malice during their lifetime; the spirits or ghosts of malicious or jealous women were thought to be particularly capable of becoming the female demons called hannya. Other demons included deniziens of hell, the bull-headed gozu and the horse-headed mezu.

According to Zeami's Fushikaden, oni appearing in Noh drama are either vengeful spirits (onryō) who possess human beings, or demons of hell. As the visible forms of oni were represented as misshapen and weird beings, popular iconography of oni was influenced by graphic portrayals of hell demons and , gaki, "hungry ghosts,"
as well as by the four-eyed Chinese zhuīnuó (Jp. tsuina) masks worn by the demon exorcists called
fangxiàng (Jp. hōsōshi).

Such rites of "demon exorcism" or tsuina were incorporated into the Buddhist rites of Shushōe and Shunie  (Omizutori) held early in the New Year; these rites featured exorcisms of demons using the power of Buddhist tutelaries such as Bishamon and heavenly bodhisattvas (hiten). These rites became popular observances on the last day of winter (setsubun), and resulted in the formation of stereotypical demon images such as Shutendōji.

A second type of oni is represented by marginalized persons, including foreigners, rebellious indigenous peoples, people drifting ashore in Japan, itinerant performers, religious thaumaturges, rebels, pirates, and mountain dwellers. According to the Nihongi, people thought to have been members of a northern people and called mishihase (or shukushin) were feared as "demons" (oni), and engaged in trade with the Yamato army through a form of Chinese "wordless exchange" which was called kishi  (lit., "demon market").

The Kokoncho monjū (ca. 1254) relates a tale of naked imigrants who came ashore at the island of Okushima in the Izu area, describing them as "demons" with wild hair, round-eyes and tall, dark red bodies. Practitioners of Onmyōdō (Chinese Yin-Yang divination) were likewise viewed as "demon-like" beings since they were believed to control familiar spirits (shikigami) and cast spells.

A third type of demon can be seen in present-day observances of the aforementioned rites of Shushōue and Shunie, and popular rites around the New Year. For example, the "Flower Festival" (Hanamatsuri) held in Shidara, Aichi Prefecture features dancers called "Sakaki-oni" which invoke blessings by stamping the ground and chasing away evil spirits.
Another example would be the visiting kami called namahage in Akita, represented by costumed performers wearing demon masks.
- source : Kawamura Kunimitsu, Kokugakuin -


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- - - - - Glossary - - - - -

ashikimono 悪しき者 evil spirit
ashiki yatsu no reiki 悪しき奴の霊気

. gaki 餓鬼 "The Realm of Hungry Ghosts" .

. Gozu 牛頭 / Gozu Tennō 牛頭天王 .

. Hannya 般若 Hanya demon masks .

. hiten 飛天 flying Apsaras, divine nymphs .

matsurowanu kami まつろわぬ神 unruly Kami . 不順(まつろ)わぬ鬼神

mishihase 粛慎(しゅくしん、みしはせ、 あしはせ (or shukushin)

. Mezu, Gozuki Mezuki 牛頭鬼馬頭鬼 .

. Namahage なまはげ - ナマハゲ in Akita .

. onryoo 怨霊 / goryoo 御霊 "vengeful spirits" .
- Goryoo Matsuri 御霊祭 Goryo Festival  

. sakaki oni 榊鬼 Sakaki demon . - Aichi

. Shikigami 式神 / シキガミ, Shiki no Kami 式の神 Shiki deity, demon or ghost .
- and Abe no Seimei 阿倍晴明 (921 - 1005) - Onmyo-Do

. Shuten Dooji 酒呑童子 Shuten Doji "Sake Child" Demon .

. tsuina 追儺 "demon exorcism" rituals .
- hoosooshi, hōsōshi 方相氏(ほうそうし)Hososhi, demon exorcist / - Setsubun 節分 - Shushōue and Shunie


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. - - - Join the Onipedia friends on facebook ! - - - .

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. Onipedia - 鬼ペディア - Oni Demons - ABC-List - .

. Tengu 天狗と伝説 Tengu legends "Long-nosed Goblin" .

. - yookai, yōkai 妖怪 Yokai monsters - .

. Legends and Tales from Japan 伝説 - Introduction .

. Mingei 民芸 Regional Folk Art from Japan .

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3/05/2015

Kappa-Do Hall

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- KAPPA - 河童 / かっぱ / カッパ - Water Deity -
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- Kappadoo 河童堂 Kappa-Do Hall -
岐阜県岐阜市・岐阜護国神社 Gifu Gokoku Jinja




Kappa Daimyoojin 河童大明神 Kappa Daimyojin





Even the box for money offerings is in the form of a Kappa.
saisen ire 賽銭入れ






In the back of the compound there are many concrete walls with Kappa art.
コンクリートの壁に絵が掛けられていた




Look at many more photos !
- source : kodawarinikki

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- quote
Kappa Matsuri 河童祭 Kappa Festival Mid-July
Children offer cucumbers and have a sumo wrestling contest (相撲大会).
With prayers for avoiding water accidents and other disasters. Also praying for the health of the children.
- source : http://burari2161.fc2web.com/kaxtupa.html

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More photos of the shrine
- source : koalaの部屋
50代主婦の日記です


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岐阜市内護国神社の、片隅にある河童堂という河童







Many more Kappa photos
- source : photokasahara

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. . . CLICK here for Photos !


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There are various places with this name, not only shrines or temples.


- source : myreco.me/shop



- source : 旧式河童堂歳々ブログ


名刺作成-名刺通販の河童堂
気仙沼河童堂
旧式河童堂
河童堂かっぱちんのキッチン cooking

- reference -

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. - - - Join my Kappa friends on facebook ! - - - .

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. Kappa densetsu 河童伝説, Kappa minwa 河童民話 - Legends - Introduction .

. Mingei 民芸 Regional Folk Art from Japan .

- #kappa -
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3/02/2015

Tetsugi Shrine

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- KAPPA - 河童 / かっぱ / カッパ - Legends -
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- Tetsugi Jinja 手接神社 -
茨城県小美玉市世沢 Ibaraki

lit. "The Shrine of the Grafted Arm", see the legend below.



- source and photos : bouguya.exblog.jp

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Praying at this shrine will help heal problems with your hand and arms.

. - Kappa no kusuri カッパの薬 / 河童の薬 Kappa and medicine - .

There are many legends of a Kappa who had exchanged his arm for a special medicine and then died, but this legend comes in some versions.





- quote
Once upon a time
some say it was toward the end of the Heian period, on a late afternoon, the Lord Serizawa 芹澤氏 was riding alone along the banks of a river. A kappa lived in this river at that time.
Suddenly his horse stopped.
When the lord looked down he saw a Kappa pulling at its tail to get the horse into the water.



The Lord was taken by surprize.
"His must be the bad guy who is doing so much harm to the villagers all the time!"
He took his sword, grabed the tail of his horse and cut off the arm of the Kappa.
The Kappa had to jump back into the water without his arm and the hand with the web between the fingers 水掻き to make his such a good swimmer.

The Lord thought this arm of the Kappa was quite special and put it up on the shelf in the tokonoma 床の間 decoration alcove of his reception room.

Late at night a lone man knocked at his gate and asked for a lodging for this night.
His face was a pale green and he had only one arm.
The Lord did not want to ask the poor man about the reason for the missing arm and had a bed prepared for him. Then he went to sleep himself.



- - - BUT
at midnight, he felt the presence of another being and indeed, when he checked, the man was just trying to steal the arm of the Kappa from the shelf.

"Hey, so you are a thief after all!" he yelled at the man.
The man turned into a Kappa in no time, grabbed the arm on the shelf and tried to run out of the estate.

But the Lord, who was a strong man, caught the Kappa and bound him with a rope.
"At least now we know who you are, you vicious Kappa.
I will not allow you to harm my villagers any more, you bad bad Kappa!"

"Dear Lord, please forgive me, I will never be bad again. Please, please, let me go back to my river! I understand your anger very well, but you see, I have an old mother and if I do not come home to care for her, she will die too. Just thinking about her makes me so sad!"

When the Lord heard this story, he felt pity with the Kappa.
"Well, because of your mother I will forgive you for today. But you have to promise never to do any harm again. As a punishment for your misdeeds so far, I will keep this arm of yours!"

But the Kappa pleaded again. If he dose not get his arm back, he said, he can do nothing and not help his old mother and in the end, the Lord let him have the arm back.

"For the sake of your mother and since you seem to care so much for her (oya kookoo 親孝行),
I will let you have the arm back."
"Thank you so very much, my Lord. I will never forget you and pay you back a favor some time!"

Next morning - oh wonder - a huge carp was hanging from the branch of a tree in his garden.
And the following morning, - oh wonder - a huge eels was hanging on the branch.
And you guess, the following morning - oh wonder - a crucian carp (funa フナ) was hanging on the branch.

The Lord asked his retainers, but nobody had done this and nobody knew anything about this fish present.
A month went by, half a year went by, a year went by with a fish present hanging on the tree every morning.

Then came a very cold day of winter, with a strong cold gale blowing and on this morning, nothing was hanging on the branch.
"I wonder what happened to our fish provider. Maybe he is ill?"
And the Lord went down to the river to have a look.

When he looked down at the river from the bank, he saw something bobbing in the water.
When he came closer, he saw the dead body of the Kappa with o huge would on one of his arms.
And in his hand the Kappa was grabbing a huge huge carp.

When the Lord saw the hand grabbing the carp, he suddenly realized who had brought a fish to his garden every morning. It was the Kappa he had once spared the life!
So the Lord had a shrine build upstream to venerate and thank the Kappa for his daily presents-
the Tetsugi Jinja - lit. "The Shrine of the Grafted Arm".
The End.
- reference : isituka_mitiko


Another source quoted that the Kappa was also passing on the recipe for a medicine to heal wounds.
The family of Serizawa kept the medicine for many many generations, and after they lost their status as samurai, they made a living as doctors.
Serizawa Kamo 芹沢鴨 (? - 1863), of the Shinsengumi, was a member of this clan.
- reference : shittaka37.seesaa.net





The name of the bridge is also given as 手奪橋 Teubaibashi - bridge of the captured arm.
across the river 梶無川 Kajinashigawa.
(茨城県行方市玉造町芹沢橋)
The Kappa grabbed the horse's tail when the Lord rode over this bridge.
- reference : ameblo.jp/shokokai-namegata






The name of the Kappa is given as 七郎河童 Shichiro Kappa.

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source : denebolaleonis.blog

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. . . CLICK here for Photos !

- reference -

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- quote -
Serizawa Kamo 芹沢鴨 (1826? – October 30?, 1863)
was a samurai known for being the original lead commander of the Shinsengumi. He trained in and received a licence in the Shindō Munen-ryū. "Kamo" means goose or duck in Japanese which was an odd name to call oneself at the time.
His full name was Serizawa Kamo Taira no Mitsumoto (Serizawa=family name, Kamo=given name, Taira=family clan name, Mitsumoto=formal given name.)

The Serizawa family were upper-seat Goshi rank samurai in Serizawa village in Mito which is now the capital of Ibaraki Prefecture in Japan. Kamo was born as the youngest son and his childhood name was Genta. He had two older brothers and an older sister. He was educated with the Sonnō jōi ideals (meaning revere the Tenno (emperor) and expel the foreigners) and swordsmanship since childhood at Kodoukan which was a state school in Mito. Mito is a sub-branch of the Tokugawa family and it was considered the motherland of the Sonnō Jōi ideology and was a center of support for the Tennō and the Imperial court, which helped fuel the Revolution.



- maybe Zerisawa 芹沢鴨?

Although no portrait of Kamo remains, it is said he was a large man with very pale skin and small eyes.

On one hand, Serizawa was quite bold and fearless and on the other hand, he was extremely selfish and had a terribly short temper so he started fights often. If he was in a bad mood he would get violent, especially when he was drinking, and he was a heavy drinker.
He was an idealist who held very strong pro-Imperial court beliefs and took the Sonno-joi beliefs very seriously while at the same time siding with the Tokugawa regime. A small fact that is less well-known is that Serizawa was good at drawing and showed his drawings to children.
- source : wikipedia


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. - - - Join my Kappa friends on facebook ! - - - .

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. Kappa densetsu 河童伝説, Kappa minwa 河童民話 - Legends - Introduction .

. Mingei 民芸 Regional Folk Art from Japan .

- #kappatetsugi #tetsugi -
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1/18/2015

komainu lion dogs

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- KAPPA - 河童 / かっぱ / カッパ - Shinto shrines -
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- komainu, koma-inu 狛犬 lion dog -

They stand in front of a Shinto shrine to protect the precincts -
and scare away impure creatures.

The most common guardian animal at the entrance of a shrine is the
. komainu, koma inu 狛犬 lit. "Korean Dog" .

They come in a pair, one with its mouth open agyoo 阿形;
and one with its mouth closed, ungyoo 吽形, thus representing the beginning (alpha) and end (omega) of all things.

. koma...  狛  shrine guardian animals .
- Introduction -


Kappa komainu カッパ狛犬 / 河童狛犬 Kappa as Komainu

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source : mie university

This is a painting of the Kappa at the temple Joken-Ji in Tono

When a malicious Kappa tried to pull a horse into the water, he got caught by the farmers and had to promise to be good from now on. Then there was a fire at the temple and the Kappa rushed by, poured endless water from his plate on the head and extinguished the fire.

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. - Kappabuchi, Kappa-buchi 河童淵 / カッパ淵 / 河童が渕
"Kappa pool", Kappa riverside - Introduction .

at Tono, Iwate 遠野 岩手.



- - - - - Look at more photos here :
source : anzubiyori.blog.so-net.ne.jp


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- shared by John Dougill


At shrine Hiruko Sha 蛭子社, on the way to Inari Jinja 稲荷神社 in the compound of the famous Suwa Jinja 諏訪神社 in Nagasaki.
If you pour water in the plate on its head, your wish will be granted.

- quote
Suwa Shrine (諏訪神社 Suwa jinja)
the major Shinto shrine of Nagasaki, Japan, and home to the Nagasaki Kunchi (kunchi (くんち) means "september nine festival" kunichi 九日).
. . . komainu
Another unique feature of Suwa shrine are the "stop lions".
They are two stone-carved guardian lions (koma-inu), and tradition holds that if one wishes to stop a behavior, such as smoking, one should tie a piece of paper or string around their front legs and pray for their assistance.
- - - More in the WIKIPEDIA !

Hiruko no mikoto 蛭子命 Hiruko is identified with Ebisu.
. Ebisu えびす 恵比寿  .

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. Wakamiya Jinja 若宮神社 - Ehime .
Two Kappa as koma-inu

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. . . CLICK here for Photos !

- reference -


. koma...  狛  shrine guardian animals .
- Introduction -

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. - - - Join my Kappa friends on facebook ! - - - .

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. Kappa densetsu 河童伝説, Kappa minwa 河童民話 - Legends - Introduction .

. Mingei 民芸 Regional Folk Art from Japan .


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[ . BACK to WORLDKIGO . TOP . ]

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omamori amulets

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- KAPPA - 河童 / かっぱ / カッパ - Shinto Shrines -
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- omamori お守り amulets to protect from water accidents -
kappayoke, kappa yoke 河童除け / カッパ除け
amulets to ward off evil influence of a kappa
mizuyoke 水難除け amulets to ward off water accidents


These amulets are sold at Buddhist temples and Shinto shrines in Japan.

They are the Kappa-version of
. yakuyoke 厄除け amulets to ward off evil .
- Introduction -


. Kappadera かっぱ寺 Kappa temples - Introduction  .

. Kappa jinja 河童神社 Kappa shrines - Introduction .

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聖徳寺 temple Shotoku-Ji , Kumamoto 熊本市
A temple with a Kappa legend.

河童が馬にイタズラをしたと伝わるのが、聖徳寺さんから少し離れた所にある川の側にあります、高橋東神社の境内に今も残る巨大な楠木。
ここにつながれていた馬に、河童がちょっかいを出して聖徳寺まで引きずられてきたわけです。



かつては川に入る子供達はこの水難除けの御札を小さな竹筒に入れて肩からかけていたとの事でしたが、最近では川に入って泳ぐという事自体が少なくなって来たので、この御札の活躍の場も無くなって来たというお話でした。

- source : sakuragaoka - syoutoku

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. Hyozu Shrines 兵主神社 Hyozu Jinja in Japan .
They are all famous for their power to prevent evil from a Kappa 河童除け (kappa yoke, kappayoke)


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. Matsubara Kappa Sha 松原河童社 .
at Saga Jinja 佐嘉神社, Saga, Kyushu 佐賀
with amulets to ward off evil and have good luck 開運厄除守



佐賀県佐賀市松原2丁目10 松原河童社
- source : matome.naver.jp/odai

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. Suitenguu 水天宮 Shrine of the Water God - Introduction .
Fukuoka, Kyushu 福岡 九州 - Kurume town 久留米市
265 Senoshita-machi Kurume City / 福岡県久留米市瀬下町265

This is the Head Shrine of all the Suitengu shrines in japan.

There are a lot of legends about Kappa fighting the humans in the area of the Chikugo river 筑後川. But in the end the humans won and 九千坊河童 Kusengbo Kappa became the protector deity at this Suitengu Shrine.
So there are some prescriptions for the Shrine worshippers to prevent water accidents.

Before entering the water of a river you have to call out
"I am a heavenly messenger (mooshigo 申し子) sent from the Suitengu Shrine".
「水に入る前には水天宮の申し子だと唱える」

Other preventions from water accidents are :
- - not to eat mushrooms before entering the water
- - to have a bite from the rice offered at the Buddhist family altar 仏前飯




Kappa amulets of the shrine 河童面(かっぱめん)(箱・絵馬)
one mask comes in a box, the other on a votive tablet (ema).
They prevent evil influence and disasters. They must be hung in the demon-avoiding corner 鬼門 of the home.
Also 河童竹 and clay bells with the Kappa 河童鈴.

. dorei 土鈴 Kappa Clay Bell from Suitengu .


amulet to protect children (boys and girls) お子様が持つ肌守(身代わり)

- - - - - Homepage of the Shrine and more amulets
- source : www.suitengu.net


. 九千坊河童 Kyusenbo kappa - Kusenbo Kappa .
and the legends of - Tanushimaru 田主丸 Fukuoka -


. Kimon, the "Demon Gate" 鬼門 .
in the North-East


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- reference - 河童除け -


oni to bijutsu 鬼と美術 - Japanese Demons and Art
- - - - - . oni omamori 鬼お守り Demon Amulets .
. WKD - .
- Introduction -

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. - - - Join my Kappa friends on facebook ! - - - .

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. yakuyoke 厄除け amulets to ward off evil .
- Introduction -


. Kappa densetsu 河童伝説, Kappa minwa 河童民話 - Legends - Introduction .

. Mingei 民芸 Regional Folk Art from Japan .


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[ . BACK to WORLDKIGO . TOP . ]

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1/15/2015

Hyozu no Kami

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- KAPPA - 河童 / かっぱ / カッパ - ABC-Index -
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- hyoozu no kami, Hyōzu 兵主神 Hyozu no Kami
- Deity of Wind and Weapons -

兵主大神(ひょうずのおおかみ) Hyozu no Okami
兵統良神(ひょうすべらがみ Hyosuberagami (Nagasaki) is Kappa as the messenger of the Water Deity 水神さま.

. suijin 水神 water deity .
and shrines dedicated to Kappa san
Kappa Jinja 河童神社 Kappa Shinto Shrines

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Hyosube anatomical illustration - Mizuki Shigeru : Yokai Daizukai
. Mizuki Shigeru 水木 しげる Shigeru Mizuki . .

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- quote -
Kazenokami 風の神 "kami of wind," also known as fūjin 風神.
Japan's geographic setting, in an area exposed to strong seasonal winds, makes the wind an important factor in everyday life, farming, and maritime industries. As a result, Japan has been home to beliefs in tutelaries of wind since ancient times.

Another common belief was that a "divine wind" (shinpū 神風 ) accompanied the coming and goings of kami. The Kojiki, Nihongi and Engishiki list the names Amenomihashira no kami, Kuninomihashira no kami, Shinatsuhiko no mikoto, and Shinatobe no mikoto as kami of wind. Amenohashira no kami and Kuninomihashira no kami are the chief objects of worship (saijin) of the Yamato-region shrine Tatsuta Jinja, which is well known for its Fūjinsai or "wind kami festival," and which has long been the center of a cult dedicated to rituals for protection from wind damage.
Among the shrines enshrining Shinatobe no mikoto and Shinatsuhiko no mikoto is the Kazahinomi no miya, a detached shrine (betsugū) of the Grand Shrines of Ise; legend relates that the "divine wind" which blew at the occasion of the thirteenth-century Mongol invasions originated from there.

The shrine Anashinimasu Hyōzu Jinja in Nara (and other Anashi shrines nationwide), is said to enshrine a kami of blacksmithing (kajishin), thought to be related to the words anaji and anaze, local terms referring to stormy seasonal winds from the northwest. As a result, these shrines are thought to have originally been patronized as part of a cult for the prevention of damaging winds. Local cults can also be found in many areas involving the use of symbolic scythes or sickles as magical implements to ensure protection from the wind.

In addition to such shrine rites to subdue winds and assure abundant crops, observances directed toward the wind kami included magical invocations to the kami, observance of the Kaze matsuri (wind festival), all-night vigils to the wind (kaze himachi), and the performance of traditional lion dances.

Most of these rituals were observed around the "210th day"counting from the first day of the old luni-solar new year or risshun - the day believed to signal the start of the typhoon season. Typhoons arriving around that time were in fact the cause of great crop damage.

Many locales also observed "wind kami exorcisms" (kaze no kami okuri) resembling exorcistic rites to drive off evil spirits. Such rites were meant not only to avert typhoons and other heavy winds, but also to exorcise and drive away evil spirits and "epidemic kami" (ekishin) believed responsible for colds and influenza, since the word for "wind" (kaze) was a homophone for another word meaning "cold."
source : Kokugakuin Suzuki Kentarō 2005



. fuujin 風神 Windgott .  
taifuu 颱風 / 台風 typhoon and more season words  

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In relation to Kappa, this deity relates to the fart (wind) of a kappa.

Regional names of the Kappa and his cousins are a reminder:

. hyoosube, hyōsube 兵主部 / ひょうすべ Hyosube . from Saga, Kyushu
The Hyosube is a child-sized river monster from Kyushu that lives in underwater caves, ventures onto land at night to eat rice plants. The creature has a relatively small brain, and a nervous system specialized in detecting humans. A pair of rotating bone coils produce an illness inducing bacteria that the yôkai sprinkles on unsuspecting humans.
Their favorite food is raw, bloody, human anuses.


hyoosubo ヒョウスボ カッパ /兵主坊 Hyosubo
- quotes -
ヒョウスボは水の神 Hyosubo is a deity of the water in Miyazaki.
At night he climbs up the mountain, in the morning he returns to the river. When he walks down, he pants hoihoi ホイホイ.
When humans meet a Hyosubo on the way, they will be unlucky, maybe even have a fire in their estate.

When the buckwheat flowers are in bloom, late at night at Mount Atagoyama in Osaki 愛宕山のオサキ(尾根)a kappa (Hyosubo) comes out of the river and climbs up the mountain, panting hyoohyoo 「ヒョウヒョウ」.
Until 1982 local folk heard him frequently. But since a new road and more houses were built in the region, nobody has heared him any more.

and one more story from Miyasaki宮崎県
If you hang the arm of a monkey in the horse barn, it will prevent the Hyosubo from coming in. The monkey is stronger than the kappa Yosubo, even in water. Hyosubo usually come at night to pester the horses. When a horse has been exposed to this, it will be all over in sweat the next morning and not come to rest any more.
- source : www.nichibun.ac.jp


ひょうすんぼ Hyosunbo
ひょうすえ Hyosue、ひょうすぼ Hyoosubo、ヒョウスンボ Hyoosunbo、ひょうすんべ Hyoosunbe
. Kappa Legends from Miyazaki  河童伝説 - 宮崎県 .

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- quote -
兵主部 Hyōsube Yokai

ALTERNATE NAMES: hyōsue, hyōsubo, hyōsunbo, hyōsunbe
HABITAT: rivers and streams; found primarily on Kyushu and in West Japan
DIET: omnivorous; prefers eggplants

APPEARANCE:
Hyōsube are squat, hairy humanoids found mostly in the southern and western parts of Japan. They are cousins of kappa and garappa, but much more savage and belligerent. They are short, with bald scalps, sharp claws, and a mouth full of sharp teeth which are prominently visible due to the malicious smile they wear. They are covered with a pelt of thick, greasy hair which gathers dust, oil, and dirt, and constantly sheds wherever they go. Their name is said to come from the “hyo- hyo-” call that they make; however, when written in kanji, the characters used have a martial connotation.



BEHAVIOR:
Hyōsube live near rivers, where they enjoy catching wild fish and generally keep away from humans. Their favorite food is the eggplant, and they are capable of devouring whole patches very quickly. They share a love of mischief and a hatred of horses with their cousins the kappa, though they are generally more violent and malicious. Also like their cousins, hyōsube retain a strong sense of honor despite their love of mischief and violence.

INTERACTIONS:
Hyōsube are capricious, insolent, and extremely dangerous. A person who simply looks at a hyōsube may be struck with a terrible and highly contagious fever, which can quickly spread and turn into an epidemic. Hyōsube cackle with an evil laughter which is also quite contagious; an unlucky person who hears a hyōsube laugh, and who laughs himself, will be struck with a sudden fever and die within hours.

A hyōsube’s thick hair builds up a lot of dirt and grime, and they love nothing more than to sneak into houses at night and slip into the bathtub. When a hyōsube finds a bathtub it likes, it will often return every night, leaving a thick scum of greasy body hair and a horrible stench to be found in the morning. Once, the unlucky owner of such a house emptied the bathwater and threw out the hair and grease. This angered the hyōsube so much that it slaughtered the owner’s horse the next night. In another story, some hyōsube hairs dumped from a bathtub landed on a nearby horse, and the animal promptly dropped dead. In yet another tale, a woman spied on a hyōsube ravaging her eggplant garden; the next morning her entire body had turned purple, and she died soon after that.

Hyōsube are occasionally honored at local Shinto shrines, usually as gods of war, for some form of military service they performed for villagers in the past. Farmers living in areas inhabited by hyōsube often leave offerings of the first eggplants harvested in hopes that the hyōsube will spare their fields for the remainder of the year. Those who do not leave offerings occasionally find their fields trampled in anger.
... They are cousins of kappa and garappa, but much more savage and belligerent.
- source : yokai com -

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The following relation about the number THREE is still not finally researched.
If you have any additional information, please share it.

A kappa is said to have three komon 肛門 anus, or simply put three holes.
All three are used for farting and the fart is rather smelly. When a Kappa feels in danger or that death is close, huge farts come out from here (hence the relation to the God of Wind). The wind from a large fart can also lift a Kappa high into the air to fly.

Why three ?
Kappa is revered as hyoozu no kami 兵主神 Hyozu-no-kami
There are three shrines relating to this deity.

The first shrine is Itate Hyoozu Jinja 射楯兵主神社 Hyozu Jinja in Harima, Hyogo.
and related to this,
there is Anashinimasu hyoozu jinja 穴師坐兵主神社 with many ana holes.

Sugawara Michizane is also revered in Hyogo. How about the MITSU at the Tenmangu 天宮の満(みつ)? mitsu 三 is a pun with the number 3.
I am not sure which shrine this is.

Oonamuchi no kami 大穴牟遅神  Onamuchi no kami / 大穴持命(大国主) Okuninushi is revered at a shrine in Hyogo too, so there is the ana 「穴」 hole.

The circle of three 菅原 - 大穴 - 穴師 - 兵主 -- 河童

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- - - - - Shrines dedicated to 大穴牟遅神 Okuninushi 大国主神 in Hyogo 兵庫県

生石神社 - Oshiko Jinja - 兵庫県高砂市阿弥陀町生石 - 大穴牟遅神
佐用都比売神社 Sayo Tsuhime Jinja - 兵庫県佐用郡佐用町本位田 - 大国主命
御形神社 - Mikata Jinja - 兵庫県宍粟郡一宮町森添  -  葦原志許男神 (あしはらしこお)
三坂神社 - Misaka Jinja - 兵庫県三木市志染町御坂243  - 葦原志許男命

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- - - - - Other Hyozu Shrines 兵主神社 in Japan

兵庫県丹波市鎮座 Hyogo, Tango
兵庫県西脇市鎮座 Hyogo, Nishiwaki
長崎県壱岐市鎮座 Nagasaki, Iki
大阪府岸和田市 Osaka, Kishiwada

水神宮, 東彼杵郡波佐見町長野郷 Nagasaki

They are all famous for their power to prevent evil from a Kappa 河童除け (kappa yoke, kappayoke).

The relation of Michizane, the Tengu / Tenjin shrines and Kappa is not quite clear to me yet.
But at Egara Tenjin in Kamakura, for example, there is a festival with many kappa lanterns made by the local children.
. Egara Tenjin 荏柄天神 Shrine in Kamakura .
Sugawara Michizane 菅原道真


- quote
Scholars and Sprites at the Egara Tenjin Shrine in Kamakura
. . . Somewhat surprisingly, the unassuming Egara Tenjin is considered one of the three major shrines of the cult . . .
. . . But it's slightly to the left of the main hall that it starts to get weird.
First, there is a large stone that supposedly looks like the head of a kappa – and when garnished with a sacred shimenawa rope, indeed it does!
The kappa is a mythological, amphibian creature with webbed feet, a shell on its back, and a plate filled with water on its head, which makes for a curious hairstyle, not unlike the tonsure of old monks in Europe. Although cute, kappas mostly create mischief as such imps are wont to do, and may lure the unwary to a watery grave.
This stone is actually a monument raised in 1971 to worn-out brushes. On the front is a drawing of a kappa by the famous cartoonist Kon Shimizu, and on the back it says “Kappa fudezuka" (Kappa brush monument) in the hand of the Nobel literature prize-winning author Yasunari Kawabata. Both were residents of Kamakura.
Even odder is the 3.2 m high, paintbrush-shaped bronze monument on a mound behind it. This was erected in 1989 and features 154 different pictures of kappa painted by cartoonists in homage of Shimizu. Scholarship comes in many forms!
- source : Jan Fornell


- - - - - Part of the bronze monument :

. . . CLICK here for Photos -荏柄天神 かっぱ Egara Tenjin and Kappa !

. . . CLICK here for Photos of the paper lanterns 荏柄天神 かっぱ 提灯 !


- - - from the Japanese wikipedia:
about the Suitengu in Fukuoka near 筑後川 the River Chikugogawa
福岡県の筑後川付近には「河童と地元民とのもめごと」や「河童族同士の戦争」の伝説や「河童にちなんだ地名」など比較的年代が明確ではっきりした記録が数多く残っている。
「水に入る前には水天宮の申し子だと唱える」
Before entering the water of a river you have to call out "I am a heavenly messenger (mooshigo 申し子) sent from the Suitengu Shrine".
「水に入る前にはタケノコを食べる」「水に入る前には仏前飯を食べる」
といった河童除けの風習は久留米市の水天宮付近が起源とされる。
毎年8月には、水の祭典という祭りが行われる。これは、元々河童をあがめるために始まった祭りである。

. Chikugo no kuni 筑後国 Chikugo Province Kappa Legends . Kyushu

. yakuyoke 厄除け amulets to ward off evil .

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- quote
Gozu Tennō 牛頭天王
Literally, "ox-head-heaven-king." Also called Gion Tenjin, Gozu Tennō is a product of kami-buddha "combinatory" religion, worshiped at the Gion Shrine (Yasaka Jinja) in Kyoto,
. . . The deity also became associated with the legend of a Japanese kami of plague called Sominshōrai and was identified with the kami Susanoo; taking on a trinitarian nature that incorporated characteristics of Susanoo's consort and child, he also came to be identified with the Japanese kami Onamuchi .
- source : kokugakuin - Yonei Teruyoshi 2005


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Soosha Itate Hyoozu Jinja 射楯兵主神社 (そうしゃ いたてひょうずじんじゃ)
総社 播磨国総社 はりまのくに Harima no kuni
兵主神社(現兵主大社) present-day Hyozu-taisha Shrine



姫路市総社本町190 / 190 Soshahonmachi, Himeji, Hyogo Prefecture

- - - Homepage of the Shrine
- source : sohsha.jp



- quote -
Itate Hyozu Jinja  射楯兵主神社 Itatehyōzu Shrine
The rite at Itatehyōzu Shrine (Itatehyōzu jinja) in Himeji City, Hyōgo Prefecture,
is the exact opposite of that at Iwaa Shrine: the Single Mountain Rite is every sixty years and the Three Mountains Rite is every twenty years. Along with this there is a sacred carnival event (kami-nigiwai gyōji) that lasts for a week. A bamboo and cloth mountain about fifteen meters high is constructed and placed before the shrine entrance. On top of this is placed a hokora and atop the shrine gate is placed a small hall . Sacred food offerings (shinsen) and a variety of mochi are offered. It is said that this rite is at the request of the Iwa Deity who had been invited (kanjō) to this area.
source : Kokugakuin, Mogi Sakae


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Anashinimasu Hyoozu jinja 穴師坐兵主神社 Anashinimasu-Hyozu-jinja
Anashi niimasuhyozu-jinja (あなしにいますひょうずじんじゃ)
- Anashi, Sakurai, Nara Prefecture 633-0071 奈良県桜井市


CLICK for more photos !

- quoting weblio :
中世ごろから、穴師坐兵主神社が穴師上社、穴師大兵主神社が穴師下社と呼ばれるようになった。
From around the Medieval period, Anashinimasu-Hyozu-jinja Shrine was called Anashi-kamisha Shrine (literally, upper Anashi-jinja Shrine), while Anashi-Daihyozu-jinja Shrine was called Anashi-shimosha Shrine (literally, lower Anashi-jinja Shrine).
Hyozu-no-kami is Miketsukami (god of food).

穴師坐兵主神社(奈良県桜井市)摂社の相撲神社に、野見宿禰とともに祀られている。
He is enshrined in the Sumo-jinja Shrine that is an auxiliary shrine of Anashinimasuhyozu-jinja Shrine (Sakurai City, Nara Prefecture), along with NOMI no Sukune

祭神の「大兵主神」は現在は左社に祀られ、剣を神体とする。
Daihyozu-no-kami,' the enshrined deity of Anashi-Daihyozu-jinja Shrine is now enshrined in the left hall of the current Anashinimasu-Hyozu-jinja Shrine, and the shintai is a sword.

元の穴師坐兵主神社は、垂仁天皇2年に倭姫命が天皇の御膳の守護神として祀ったともいわれる。
There is a theory that the original Anashinimasu-Hyozu-jinja Shrine was founded by Yamatohime-no-mikoto in the year 28 BC enshrining a guardian deity of food presented to the emperor.

- quote
Hotsuma-Tsutae - Amateru's Decrees on Prayers of Succession
Kokotomusubi (also known as Tsuwamononushi, deity of the Anashi Hyozu Shrine in Sakurai, Nara Prefecture) lit the sacred beacons until their light shone all around.
- source : www.hotsuma.gr.jp

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兵主神 God of Weapons
- - - More in the WIKIPEDIA !

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Anaseniimasu hyoozu(あなせにいますひょうず)
source : yamanobe/anasi
Anashinimasu-Hyozu-jinja maintains that Hyozu-no-kami is Miketsukami (god of food).

Anashi is a place name around Sakurai town in Nara 奈良県桜井市にある地名.
Anashigawa 穴師川 in Nara.

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"The fart of a water goblin", kappa no he, 河童の屁, へのかっぱ




This expression in Japanese means something small and insignificant. If the water goblin does it in the water, it is not heard very far and does not smell, and very few of us have ever experienced it in real life ...
But the real origin of this expression seems to go further, meaning "koppa no hi 木っ端の火", the flame of a little wood splinter used for igniting a fire, which was rather insignificant in itself. People of the Edo period used to play with words, so the KOPPA became a KAPPA.


. Woman farting at a Kappa .



source : nippon.com/en/nipponblog

. Fart, farting (he 屁) - Introduction .


more links to check about the famous farting scroll
http://archive.wul.waseda.ac.jp/kosho/chi04/chi04_01029/chi04_01029.html
http://www.tofugu.com/2012/02/18/japanese-fart-scrolls/
http://en.rocketnews24.com/2014/04/22/classic-japanese-painting-picture-scroll-of-a-fart-battle-is-exactly-what-it-sounds-like/
http://hyperallergic.com/109023/an-illustrated-japanese-battle-of-farts/
http://shinku.nichibun.ac.jp/jpub/pdf/jr/JN2604.pdf

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- reference - Hyozu-no-kami -

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farting competition -
the Kappa wins
every time

Gabi Greve
. WKD - Haiku, Senryu and farting .


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. - - - Join my Kappa friends on facebook ! - - - .

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. Kappa densetsu 河童伝説, Kappa minwa 河童民話 - Legends - Introduction .

. - monkey - enkoo, enkō 猿猴 / 猿 saru and Kappa 河童 - .

. Mingei 民芸 Regional Folk Art from Japan .

- #hyosubo #hyosube -
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[ . BACK to DARUMA MUSEUM TOP . ]
[ . BACK to WORLDKIGO . TOP . ]

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