Showing posts with label - - Legends - -. Show all posts
Showing posts with label - - Legends - -. Show all posts

8/16/2017

onibi demon fire

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. Onipedia - 鬼ペディア - Oni Demons - ABC-List - .
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onibi 鬼火 "demon fire", "devil's fire"

. "devil's fire", onibi 鬼火 Will-o'-the-wisp .
"fox fire", kitsunebi 狐火 (きつねび) //
- kigo for all winter -

. janjanbi じゃんじゃん火 / ジャンジャン火 Janjan fire .
- Legends from Nara

. soogenbi 宗源火 Sogenbi / ubagabi 姥ケ火 / 姥ヶ火 in Kyoto .

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- quote -
Onibi (鬼火) is a type of atmospheric ghost light in legends of Japan. According to folklore, they are the spirits born from the corpses of humans and animals, and are also said to be resentful people that have become fire and appeared. Also, sometimes the words "will-o'-wisp" or "jack-o'-lantern" are translated into Japanese as "onibi."



- Outline
According to the Wakan Sansai Zue written in the Edo Period, it was a blue light like a pine torchlight, and several onibi would gather together, and humans who come close would have their spirit sucked out. Also, from the illustration in the same Zue, it has been guessed to have a size from about 2 or 3 centimeters in diameter to about 20 or 30 centimeters, and to float in the air about 1 or 2 meters from the ground. According to Yasumori Negishi, in the essay "Mimibukuro" from the Edo period, in chapter 10 "Onibi no Koto," there was an anecdote about an onibi that appeared above Hakone mountain that split into two and flew around, gathered together again, and furthermore split several times.
Nowadays, people have advanced several theories about their appearance and features.

- Appearance
They are generally blue as stated previously, but there are some that are bluish white, red, and yellow. For their size, there are some as small as a candle flame, to ones about as large as a human, to some that even span several meters.
- Number
Sometimes there only 1 or 2 of them appear, and also times when 20 to 30 if them would appear at once, and even times when countless onibi would burn and disappear all night long.
- Times of frequent appearance
They usually appear from spring to summer. They often appear on days of rain.
- Places of frequent appearance
They commonly appear in watery areas like wetlands, and also in forests, prairies, and graveyards, and they often appear in places surrounded by natural features, but rarely they appear in towns as well.
- Heat
The are some that, when touched, do not feel hot like a fire, but also some that would burn things with heat like real fire.

- - - - - Types of onibi - - - - -

As onibi are thought of as a type of atmospheric ghost light, there are ones like the below. Other than these, there is also the shiranui, the koemonbi, the janjanbi, and the tenka among others. There is a theory that the kitsunebi is also a kind of onibi, but there is also the opinion that strictly speaking, they are different from onibi.

Asobibi (遊火, lit. "play fire")
It is an onibi that appears below the castle and above the sea in Kōchi, Kōchi Prefecture and Mitani Mountain. One would think that it appeared very close, just for it to fly far away, and when one thinks that it has split apart several times, it would once again all come together. It is said to be of no particular harm to humans.
Igebo
It is what onibi are called in the Watarai District, Mie Prefecture.
Inka (陰火, lit. "shadow fire")
It is an onibi that would appear together when a ghost or yōkai appears.
Kazedama (風玉, lit. "wind ball")
It is an onibi of the Ibigawa, Ibi district, Gifu Prefecture. In storms, it would appear as a spherical ball of fire. It would be about as big as a personal tray, and it gives off bright light. In the typhoon of Meiji 30 (1897), this kazedama appeared from the mountain and floated in the air several times.
Sarakazoe (皿数え, lit. "count plate")
It is an onibi that appeared in the Konjaku Gazu Zoku Hyakki by Sekien Toriyama. In the Banchō Sarayashiki known from ghost stories, Okiku's spirit became appeared as an inka ("shadow fire") from the well, and was depicted as counting plates.
Sōgenbi (叢原火 or 宗源火, lit. "religion source fire")
It was an onibi in Kyoto in Sekien Toriyama's Gazu Hyakki Yagyō. It was stated to be a monk who once stole from the Jizōdō in Mibu-dera who received Buddhist punishment and became an onibi, and the anguishing face of the priest would float inside the fire. The name also appeared in the "Shinotogibōko," a collection of ghost stories from the Edo period.
Hidama (火魂, lit. "fire spirit")
An onibi from the Okinawa Prefecture. It ordinarily lives in the kitchen behind the charcoal extinguisher, but it is said to become a bird-like shape and fly around, and make things catch on fire.
Wataribishaku (渡柄杓, lit. "transversing ladle")
An onibi from Chii village, Kitakuwada District, Kyoto Prefecture (later, Miyama, now Nantan). It appears in mountain villages, and is a bluish white ball of fire that lightly floats in the air. It is said to have an appearance like a hishaku (ladle), but it is not that it actually looks like the ladle tool, but rather that it appeared to be pulling a long and thin tail, which was compared to a ladle as a metaphor.
Kitsunebi (狐火, lit. "fox fire")
It is a mysterious fire that has created various legends, there is the theory that a bone the fox is holding in its mouth is glowing. Kimimori Sarashina from Michi explained it as a refraction of light that occurs near river beds. Sometimes kitsunebi are considered a type of onibi.

- Considerations
First, considering how the details about onibi from eyewitness testimony do not match each other, onibi can be thought of as a collective term for several kinds of mysterious light phenomenon. Since they frequently appear during days of rain, even though the "bi" (fire) is in its name, they have been surmised to be different from simply the flames of combustion, and is a different type of luminescent body. It is especially of note that in the past, these phenomena were not strange.
In China in the BC era,
it was said that "from the blood of human and animals, phosphorus and oni fire (onibi) comes." The character 燐 at that time in China could also mean the luminescence of fireflies, triboelectricity, and was not a word that indicated the chemical element "phosphorus".
Meanwhile, in Japan,
according to the explanation in the "Wakan Sansai Zue", for humans, horses, and cattle die in battle and stain the ground with blood, the onibi are what their spirits turn into after several years and months.
One century after the "Wakan Sansai Zue"
in the 19th century and afterwards in Japan, as the first to speak of them, they were mentioned in Shūkichi Arai's literary work "Fushigi Benmō", stating, "the corpses of those who are buried have their phosphorus turned into onibi." This interpretation was supported until the 1920s, and dictionaries would state this in the Shōwa period and beyond.
Sankyō Kanda,
a biologist of luminescent animals, found phosphorus in 1696, and as he knew that human bodies also had this phosphorus, in Japan, the character 燐 was applied to it, and thus it can be guessed that it was mixed in with the hint from China about the relation between onibi and phosphorus. In other words, it could be surmised that when corpses decay, the phosphorus in phosphoric acid would give off light. In this way, many of the onibi would be explained, but there also remain many testimonies that do not match with the theory that of illumination from phosphorus.
After that,
there is a theory that it is not phosphorus itself, but rather the spontaneous combustion of phosphine, or the theory that it is burning methane produced from the decay of the corpse, and also a theory that hydrogen sulfide is produced from the decay and becomes the source of the onibi, and also ones that would be defined in modern science as a type of plasma. Since they often appear in days of rain, there are scientists that would explain that as Saint Elmo's fire (plasma phenomenon). The physicist Yoshihiko Ōtsuki also advanced the theory that these mysterious fires are caused by plasma.It has also been pointed out that for the lights that would appear far in the middle of darkness, that if they are able to move by suggestion, then there is a possibility that they could simply be related to optical illusion phenomena.
Each of these theories
has its own merits and demerits, and since the onibi legends themselves are of various kinds, it would be impossible to conclusively explain all of the onibi with a single theory.
Furthermore,
they are frequently confused with hitodama and kitsunebi, and as there are many different theories to explain them, and since the true nature of these onibi is unknown, there is no real clear distinction between them.
- reference source : wikipedia -


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す 駿河の北浜 鬼火の怪 - SU - Sugaru no Kitahama - Onibi no Kai
江戸妖怪かるた Edo Yokai Karuta - card game


. Japanese Legends - 伝説 民話 昔話 – ABC-List .

............................................................................ Aichi 愛知県
知多郡 Chita district  南知多町 Minami-Chita

onibi 鬼火,ashioto 足音,hanashigoe 話声,daionkyoo 大音響
尾張高野山岩屋山奥之院は、今昔を問わず修行道場として多くの人が来る。行者はいずれも三日ないし七日間断食又は火のもの断ちして、毎夜十二時から一時にかけて樹木の生い茂る真っ暗がりの堂外の諸仏を巡拝するのだが、その時、大牛が道に横たわり前進を妨げたり、幾十もの鬼火が現れたりして行の邪魔をする。また、数十人の足音や話し声が聞こえたり、屋根に大石が落ちるような大音響などがして、修行の途中で逃げる者もいる。

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- reference : nichibun yokai database 妖怪データベース -
23 to explore (01)

- reference - 鬼火 -

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. - - - Join the Onipedia friends on facebook ! - - - .

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. Onipedia - 鬼ペディア - Oni Demons - ABC-List - .

. Tengu 天狗と伝説 Tengu legends "Long-nosed Goblin" .

. - yookai, yōkai 妖怪 Yokai monsters - .

. Legends and Tales from Japan 伝説 - Introduction .

. Mingei 民芸 Regional Folk Art from Japan .

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- #onibi -
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7/18/2017

Tengu Chiba Legends Masks

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. Tengupedia - 天狗ペディア - Tengu ABC-Index .
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Chiba and its Tengu legends 千葉県と天狗伝説 


Chiba no kotengu 千葉の小天狗 The Small Tengu from Chiba

Chiba Eijiroo 千葉 栄次郎 Chiba Eijiro (1833 - 1862)
A Samurai of the Bakumatsu period. Master of the 北辰一刀流 Hokushin Ittoryu School of Swordsmanship.
He studied with his father, 千葉周作 Chiba Shusaku, and became so proficient, he was called "Small Tengu" at age 19.


千葉栄次郎 - 隊士図鑑

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嶺岡浅間の天狗面 Mineoka Asama Tengu Masks
The Mineoka Mountain District ( 嶺岡山地 Mineoka sanchi).
Mount Mineoka Asama is 336 m high. On its North-Eastern side is a temple housing 白滝不動 Shirataki Fudo and the stone Tengu masks are close to it.


source : toki.moo.jp/gaten.. gate 507...

The stone Tengu on the way have some strange forms, with a protruding mouth and a nose like a dumpling.
The locals call them 石尊山 Sekison San - Venerable Stone Deities .



There are three sanctuaries for the stone Tengu on the way up to Mount Mineoka Asama.







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Sekison San 石尊山 Venerable Stone Deities
The belief in Sekison San is known in the Tanzawa mountains, Oyama and at 富士山新五合目小御岳石尊 the 5th station of Mount Fujisan,
石尊様 Sekison Sama are also venerated in Gunma, 甘楽郡 Kanragun 南牧村 Nanmoku village.


Sekison and Fudo Myo-O at 小畑池 Obataike,銚子 Choshi, Chiba

. . . CLICK here for more Sekison Photos !



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高宕山 Takagoyama - 315 m high
From its peak there is a great view over the Kujukutani mountains, Tokyo Bay and all the way to Mount Fujisan.
Now the center of 県立高宕山自然公園, Takagoyama Prefectural Natural Park in South-central Chiba.


- quote -
Kujukutani 千葉 九十九谷
Kujukutani is the landscape of the row of mountains seen from the Kujukutani Park down from Shiratori Shrine at the southeastern end of Mt. Kano in Kimitsu City, Chiba Pref. The mountains including Mt. Takago are part of Boso Kyuryo (hills).
This picturesque landscape is composed of deep valleys and overlapping mountain ridgelines, which is selected as one of 500 Charming Spots in Boso. Purple mists at dawn or the after grow of a sunset creates a magnificent scene like an ink painting. Especially beautiful is the sea of clouds trailing along the ridgelines and fading out into the air, which can be seen from the late fall to winter.
A poet, Keigetsu Omachi, described it as “the most wonderful sight in the world.” It is said that an artist painter, Kaii Higashiyama, was inspired with this landscape and painted one of his masterpieces, “Afterglow.”
- source : nippon-kichi.jp... -


高宕山源頼朝と天狗面 Takagoyama and the Tengu Mask of Minamoto to Yoritomo
飯縄寺 Iizunadera Temple (Iinawadera)
千葉県いすみ市岬町和泉2935-1 / Chiba, Isumi, Misakichoizumi, 2935-1


source : toki.moo.jp/gaten/851-900..gate888...

Mount Takagoyama is 雨乞いの山 a mountain for rain rituals. At 清滝神社 Kiyotaki Jinja a small shrine the Waterfall Deity is venerated as 高オカミ神 the Mountain Deity.
(The old Kanji for this spelling is rain 雨 on top and below it three open mouths 口. Below it the Kanji for a dragon 龍 - a very complicated Kanji indeed, 高おかみ神.)
Below this shrine is the Kannon hall in a cave, protecting the Tengu masks.
Once upon a long time, Minamoto no Yoritomo had to flee from 小田原の石橋山 the lost battle in Odawara and took refuge here. Yoritomo stayed in the Kannon cave (高宕観音 Takago Kannon) and prayed for the return of his good luck and victory. On the pillars of this cave-hall hang the Tengu masks.

高宕山 The Kanji in the middle, 宕, refers to the cave, and this reminded people of the famous 愛宕山 Atagoyama in Kyoto.
Maybe the Tengu from Atagoyama even came here to visit ? ??

Kuraokami, Takaokami 高おかみ神 , Kuramitsuha Kuraokami no kami, Takaokami no kami
. amagoi 雨乞い rain rituals - Introduction .


淤加美神(おかみのかみ)、または龗神(おかみのかみ) - Okaminokami - 闇龗神と高龗神は同一の神. - Takaokami

- - - More in the WIKIPEDIA !

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観音堂の天狗面 The Tengu Masks of the Kannon-Hall


- quote -
牛若丸と大天狗 Ushiwakamaru and the Dai-Tengu

Iizuna temple is known as the 天狗の寺"Tengu Temple".
People come here to pray fpr fire prevention, safety on the sea, prosperous business and health.
The temple treasure is a wood carving of about 4 m length and 1 m hight by the famous carver 波の伊八 Nami no Ihachi.
It shows 牛若丸と天狗 Ushiwakamaru and the Tengu.
At the 仁王門 Nio-Mon entrance gate is a carving of a Tengu riding the waves.

- - - - - and an amulet to go with it


- reference source : isumi-kankou.com/isumi-kanko...-

. Minamoto no Yoritomo 源 頼朝 . - (1147 – 1199)
founder of the Kamakura Shogunate

. Iizuna Daigongen 飯縄大権現 Izuna Daigongen .

. 飯綱三郎天狗 Izuna Saburo Tengu .
He lives on Mount Iizunayama 飯砂山 / 飯綱山 in Nagano.

. Nami no Ihachi 波の伊八 "Ihachi the carver of waves" .
(1751-1824)
Dragon and waves 竜と波 at temple 飯縄寺 Izunadera.

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. Legends and Tales from Japan 伝説 - Introduction .

験から神主名になった人がいる。ある時2人の兄弟が京に行ったが、弟が行方知れずになった。その後大風が吹いて、杉の上で戻ってきたぞと言う弟の声が聞こえた。狗賓さまとなったこの男は今でも生きている。

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長生郡 Chosei district 長柄町 Nagara town

Someone cut the weeds below the 天狗の腰かけ松 Pine of the Tengu. The Tengu got angry, abducted him and when the man came back, he had a bad injury.
. Tengu no koshikake matsu 天狗の腰掛松 / Tengu no matsu 天狗の松 .
. . . . .

Aoso sama 青麻様 "Green Hemp Deity"
The protecting deity of the 鹿間家 Shikama family is Aoso Sama, said to be a Tengu. He protects from 中風 palsy. Its annual rituals are on the first of April and September.
The offering is red rice and never pumpkin or leek, since he does not like these vegetables.
. . . . .

A child once saw a Tengu on the bridge of 東茂原 Higashi Mobara. Soon after the child got ill and died.
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A Tengu once shape-shifted and worked at a temple in I市原 chihara town. When the priest asked him to get some Tofu he flew all the way to Kyoto to buy it.
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Many Tengu sometimes came to the 権現森 Gongenmori Park and made music with flutes and drums.
(Gongen Mori is a hill in Chiba and is nearby are Nagarayama and Rokujizō. 権現森自然公園.)

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館山市 Tateyama city

At 滝田 Takita there is 天狗の通り道 a Tengu road, where they pass with the most strange sounds when flying past. It is a rather deep forest and sometimes the forest workers, who stay over night in a small hut, can feel it moving and shaking.
. madoo 魔道 - まどう Mado, road where monsters pass .
. . . . .

At the village 平群村 Hegurimura near 岩井 Iwai there lived a Tengu. The warden of the small shrine could tell his temper: On good days the water bucked was filled by the Tengu, on bad days it was empty.
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A villager from 八束村 Yatsukamura village has seen a Tengu in the mountain forest, reading a book.

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- reference : nichibun yokai database 妖怪データベース -

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. . . CLICK here for Photos !
- reference - 千葉 天狗 伝説-

. Tengu no men 天狗の面 / 天狗面 mask of a Tengu - Introduction .

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. - - - Join my Tengupedia friends on facebook ! - - - .

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. Tengu 天狗と伝説 Tengu legends "Long-nosed Goblin" .

. - yookai, yōkai 妖怪 Yokai monsters - .

. Legends and Tales from Japan 伝説 - Introduction .

. Mingei 民芸 Regional Folk Art from Japan .

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- #tenguchiba #chibatengu #bosohantotengu -
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6/08/2017

Fudo Myo-O and Oni

[ . BACK to DARUMA MUSEUM TOP . ]
. Onipedia - 鬼ペディア - Oni Demons - ABC-List - .
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Fudo Myo-O 不動明王と鬼伝説 Oni Demon Legends and Fudo

. 不動明王 Fudo Myo-O - Acala - Vidyaraja .
- Introduction -

jaki o fumu Fudo Myo-O 邪鬼を踏む不動明王
Fudo Myo-O stepping on a Jaki demon





- The complete scroll is here :
- source : yahoo auctions June 2017 -

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. Japanese Legends - 伝説 民話 昔話 – ABC-List .

............................................................................ Aichi 愛知県
名古屋市 Nagoya 熱田区 Atsuta

高蔵不動院 Takakura Fudo-In - O-Yakushi no Oni Matsuri 大薬師の鬼祭 Demon Festival
During the Shusho-E 修正会 rituals on the fifth day of the New Year at the Temple Takakura Fudo-In there is a ritual called
O-Yakushi no Oni Matsuri, "Festival of the Demons of Yakushi Nyorai". 12 men from nearby Atsuta, aged 25 and 42 are chosen to participate as Oni. On leap years there are 13 men.
The demon masks of the temple are made of strong thick paper and ward off evil influence for the coming year. The masks are imitations of the one's from the "Bull Festival of Kyoto" 京都牛祭 (太秦の牛祭).


............................................................................ Akita 秋田県
山本郡 Yamamoto district 二ツ井町 Futatsui Machi

鬼神集落 Onigami village
The protector deity of this village is called オボシナサマ Oboshina Sama (Fudo Myo-O).

Its festival is on the 28th day of the 3rd lunar month, now on May 8. On the evening before the festival people put their boiled vegetables in a Bento lunch box and meet at the shrine, to eat it all together. They are not allowed to eat any meat on this occasion.
Then in 1956 some brave one eat some meat and what do you say - the next day was a huge fire in the hamlet and 17 homes burned down.


............................................................................ Kyoto 京都府
加佐郡 Kasa district 大江町 Oe Machi

Shuten Dooji 酒呑童子 Shuten Doji / 不動堂 Fudo-Do Hall

Onigajaya, Oni-Ga-Chaya 鬼ヶ茶屋


- reference source : city.fukuchiyama.kyoto.jp/onihaku .. onityaya -

Near the place where the remains of the mansion of Shuten Doji are supposed to be there is a huge boulder. There is also a place where the river flows upstream when the demons wash the bloody robes; this is where the villagers later they build the 不動堂 Fudo Hall below the waterfall 千丈ヶ滝下 Senjogataki.
Even further up in the mountain, where Shuten Doji was defeated by Raiko Yorimitsu there is now the shrine
鬼獄神社 Onitake Jinja / 鬼嶽稲荷神社 Onitake Inari Jinja.
Raiko had prepared Shinben Kidokushu 神便鬼毒酒 a special rice wine with poison for the Oni and was thus able to kill it.

Oni-take Inari Jinja 京都府福知山市大江町北原 Fukuchiyama, Kyoto
. Shuten Dooji 酒呑童子 Shuten Doji "Sake Child" Demon .


Onitake-Inari Jinja Shrine at the 8th station of Mt.Oe. With a beautiful view of the sea of clouds in Autumn.


............................................................................ Miyagi 宮城県
玉造郡 Tamatsukuri district 鳴子町 Naruko

鬼首村 Onikobe village (Demon Head Village) 
Once upon a time
a demon wanted to enter the village of Onikobe, but Fudo killed him and burned the body.
From the ashes arose many many many mosquitoes which to our day suck the blood of the people.


............................................................................ Nara 奈良県
生駒市 Ikoma 鬼取町 Onitori Cho

En no Gyoja met a couple of Oni who were eating humans. He asked them not to do that any more but they did not listen to him. He hid in a cave but they wanted to give him human flesh to eat even there.
Then 不動明王 Fudo Myo-O comes along and pressured the couple not to eat humans any more. Now they promised to change their ways.
Zenki went to 洞川 Dorogawa (now a famous hot spring), and Goki went to 十津川 Totsukawa .

At 生駒山 Mount Ikomasan、En no Gyoja had a dream given to him by 孔雀明 Kujaku Myo-O.
He should capture the two Oni from the foot of Ikomasan and turn them into decent beings. He stayed in prayer for 21 days and on the last day, with 不動緊縛の法 Fudo Kinboku, a special ritual of Fudo Myo-O he could capture them.
So the Oni cut off their hair and became the pious disciples of En no Gyoja.

The mountain is now called Onitorisan 鬼取山 "Mountain of capturing the Demons",
and the village is still called that way, 鬼取 Onitori.

 . Zenki 前鬼 and his wife Goki 後鬼 .



............................................................................ Oita 大分県
直入郡 Naoiri district Yamaga

Fudo Iwa 不動岩 Fudo Rock
Once upon a time,
the bottom of the 阿蘇の盆地 Plain of Aso was a lake.
A demon tried to fill the lake with earch and carried earth to the place, but he broke the pole of his carrier. The earth fell down and this became 上萩岳 Upper Ogidake mountain and下萩岳 Lower Ogidake mountain.
The Demon became angry and pressed against the boulder 不動岩 Fudo-Iwa but could not move it. Since that time, there are the remains of the demon's head, back and both hands on the boulder.

. Oita 大分県の鬼伝説 Oni Demon Legends .



This formation was named in the Heian Period by a mountain ascetic who venerated Fudo Myo-O here. It has three Fudo Rocks, the front, middle and back Fudo. The highest Front Fudo, Mae Fudo 前不動 is 80 meters high and more than 100 meters in circumference.

There are three huge rocks on this hill in Yamaga city which are collectively called "Fudo Iwa" which means literally immovable rocks. These rocks are individually known as: Mae-Fudo, Naka-Fudo, and Ato-Fudo.
Mae-Fudo is the biggest one, and from here you have a great view of mountain and sunset.

There is a story about these rocks that once upon a time,
Fudo-Iwa and Hikodake (Mt. Hiko, located in Yamaga city) were step-brothers. Their mother always treated only Fudo-Iwa with affection because she gave birth to him, but treated the other Hikodake harshly.
One day,
the mother told them to try the pulling rope game with their neck. She said, I will give the family treasure of 3 balls handed down for long time to the winner. When they started the game, because he was always eating soft and tasty beans the head of Fudo-Iwa came off easily and fell into the Kubishi Pass where it remains turned into stone.
Now it is said
that the rest of the body of Fudo-Iwa is the Fudo Iwa at present. Because Hikodake was always eating hard beans, he grew so big and tough. There is a footpath around here to enjoy walking while looking at the seasonal flowers until you reach to the observatory.
. Fudoo Iwa 不動岩 Fudo Rocks - Introcuction .



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- reference : nichibun yokai database 妖怪データベース -

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不動明王の邪鬼退治図 Fudo driving out the Jaki


source : subarukouboushop.hamazo.tv


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. - - - Join the Onipedia friends on facebook ! - - - .

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. Onipedia - 鬼ペディア - Oni Demons - ABC-List - .

. Tengu 天狗と伝説 Tengu legends "Long-nosed Goblin" .

. - yookai, yōkai 妖怪 Yokai monsters - .

. Legends and Tales from Japan 伝説 - Introduction .

. Mingei 民芸 Regional Folk Art from Japan .

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- #fudooni #onifudo -
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5/12/2016

tsukimono bewitched

- yookai, yōkai 妖怪 Yokai monsters -
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- tsukimono 憑き物 bewitched, possessed -

Being bewitched by a fox, badger, a Yokai or other ill-meaning foe was pretty common in Japan,
there are many legends and tales about it.

Another expression, often used with the fox or badger, is
kitsune ni bakasareru 狐に化かされる

Here is also a book on how to get rid of a possession or bewitchment.



憑き物の落とし方 ― 自分でできる陰陽道の作法
石田千尋

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- quote -
Tsukimono – The Possessing Thing
There are eight million gods and monsters in Japan, and more than a few of them like to ride around in human bodies from time to time. Yurei. Kappa. Tanuki. Tengu. Kitsune. Snakes. Cats. Horses. Almost anything can possess a human. But when they do, they are all known by a single name—Tsukimono, the Possessing Things.

What Does Tsukimono Mean?
Tsukimono is a straight forward term. It combines the kanji 憑 (tsuki; possession) + 物 (mono; thing). There is a different word for actual possession 憑依 (hyoi), which is the kanji 憑 (tsuki again, but this time pronounced hyo—because Japanese is hard) + 依 (I; caused by).

Although they are collectively known as tsukimono, different types of tsukimono use –tsuki as a suffix, such as kappa-tsuki (河童憑; kappa possession), tengu-tsuki (天狗憑; tengu possession), or the most common of all, kitsune-tsuki (狐憑; fox possession).

(憑 is an odd kanji by the way. It can do double duty not only as the verb tsuku (憑く; to possess) but also as a kanji for tanomu (憑む; to ask a favor). So in a strange way, possession means asking a favor of someone—really, really hard.)

Shinto God Possession
“The number of possessing spirits in Japan is something enormous. It is safe to say that no other nation of forty millions of people has ever produced its parallel" - Percival Lowell .....
..... this kind of God Possession—known alternately as kamiyadori (神宿り; kami dwelling), kamioroshi (神降ろし; kami descending), or kamigakari (神懸り; divine possession) –is different from tsukimono. .....

Tsukimono – Yokai and Animal Possession .....
..... it is always involuntary on the part of the possessed. No one invites a tsukimono into their body. .....
Types of Tsukimono – Snakes, Foxes, and Everything Else.....
- - - - - Mizuki Shigeru agrees with Percival Lowell. In his Mujyara, series he identifies the following types of possession. It is is by no means meant to be a complete list:

• Jizo-tsuki – Possession by Jizo
• Hannya-tsuki – Hannya possession
• Gaki-tsuki – Hungry Ghost possession
• Ikiryo-tsuki – Living Ghost possession
• Shibito-tsuki – Ghost possession
• Kappa-tsuki – Kappa possession
• Tengu-tsuki – Tengu possession
• Neko-tsuki – Cat possession
• Hebi-tsuki – Snake possession
• Tanuki-tsuki – Tanuki possession
• Uma-tsuki – Horse possession
• Inu-tsuki – Dog possession
• Kitsune-tsuki – Fox possession




Kitsune-tsuki is by far the most common type of tsukimono. It is also different from other tsukimono—instead of the possessed taking on fox-attributes, kitsune-tsuki feels like a bodily attack, with shortness of breath, phantom pains, speaking in strange voices, and epileptic fits. Kitsune-tsuki symptoms resembled classic demonic possession in Western culture.
- read the article here
- source : Zack Davisson -

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- quote
Witchcraft in Japan: The Roots of Magical Girls
..... Just like in the West, people in pre-modern Japan often explained phenomena like illness, floods and other misfortunes with evil spirits. In Japan’s case, these evil spirits were thought to take the shape of animals: dogs, badgers, and especially foxes. These tsukimono (憑き物, “possessing beings”) took possession of people in their search for food or other creature comforts. When they did so, bad luck, illness, and other misfortunes befell the possessed and those around them.



Alternatively, some people weren’t possessed by tsukimono but kept them as pets or familiars. It is these people who are considered witches. Having tsukimono was usually a family affair. Families who owned tsukimono were known as tsukimono-suji (憑き物筋) or tsukimono-zukai (憑き物使い). In these cases, the tsukimono could have a beneficial impact on their handlers, bringing wealth and prosperity. And on the flip side, they were thought to bring illness and bad luck to anyone the owners dislike. This resulted in the families being feared and respected, but also ostracized.

People were hesitant to do business with such a family, and they had trouble selling property. In addition, the tsukimono were inheritable through the female line, making it nearly impossible for these women to find husbands. Tsukimono could not be disinherited or disowned, but one could attempt exorcisms with a Shinto priest, female medium or other spirit specialists. In Tohoku and Kyushu prefectures, religious practitioners and not families were thought to wield tsukimono. So these people could not only cure you of tsukimono possession but curse you with it, too.

Often these tsukimono-suji were simply wealthier than their neighbors. When jealous tongues started wagging and the rumors stuck, the family would be marked forever. As in Europe and America, being accused of this sort of witchcraft had a negative impact on the families’ lives. Nevertheless, belief in these tsukimono was widespread. Cases of spirit possession as late as 1997 have been recorded.

In Japan, witchcraft wasn’t exclusive to women, although it’s interesting to note that the tsukimono are passed down generation to generation through the female line. This seems to affirm a widespread global belief that women are more capable of – and likely to be involved in – witchcraft.

Perhaps predictably, cats also feature in Japanese witch stories. Hundreds of years ago, it was a common belief that girls who visited a temple after the sun went down risked being targeted by a witch. The witch, disguised as a kindly old woman, would lure the girl to her house with the promise of a warm bed for the night. Once inside, the witch would resume her ordinary, frightening form and promptly devour the girl. And because cats often hung around temples, it was believed that they were witches in disguise, waiting for their next victim.



Today, a witch can be good or evil, and not always as self-serving as our ancestors believed. Japan’s magical girls have come a long way from their spirit-wielding roots and are hardly seen as evildoers but rather as guardians and protectors. Looking at certain prominent anime and manga that feature magical girls, one will notice that there’s always some sort of familiar either bestowing the magical gift upon the protagonists or, at least, helping out with it. .....
- source : japanistas.com/en/archives

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憑き物 - 鳥飼 否宇


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. Jizo Bosatsu - 地蔵菩薩 .

Jizoo tsuki 地蔵憑き Possession by Jizo

Tofu Jizo 豆腐地蔵
山梨県飽海郡松山町竹田 Yamanashi, 善応寺 Zeno-Ji
相馬地方では大病の人、もしくは紛失物などがある時は「地蔵憑け」という事をする。それは村の老婆や婦人などがやって来て円形に座り、村でもあまり賢くない子供一人を中に入れ、子供にお札を持たせ、周囲の人が口々に、
南無地蔵大菩薩 おつきやれ 地蔵さん 地蔵さん 地蔵さん 
とせめ立てると中の子供は一種の催眠作用か、ぶるぶると札をふるわせれば地蔵さんは憑いたのである。それを見て色々病のことなれば、薬の処方、又は医者の方角、失せ物なれば、その方角、距離、出るか、出ないかを聞くのである。それが当たる様で、時々地蔵憑きをする。
- reference : jabaranran.blogspot.jp/2014 -

- reference -

. Bakejizo, Bake-Jizo 化け地蔵 / 化地蔵 Jizo as a yokai monster .
obake Jizoo お化け地蔵 O-bake Jizo

. 東福院 Tofuku-In Tokyo .
豆腐地蔵 Tofu Bean Curd Jizo at Tofuku-in Temple

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. Legends and Tales from Japan 伝説 - Introduction .

. possessed by a fox 狐憑き .

. possessed by a Tanuki badger 狸憑き .


- reference : nichibun yokai database 妖怪データベース -
226 憑き物 to explore

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. - - - Join my Kappa friends on facebook ! - - - .

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. Kappa densetsu 河童伝説, Kappa minwa 河童民話 - Legends - Introduction .

. - yookai, yōkai 妖怪 Yokai monsters - .


. Legends and Tales from Japan 伝説 - Introduction .

. Mingei 民芸 Regional Folk Art from Japan .

- #tsukimono #bewitched #possessed -
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12/01/2015

Kappa Legends Contents

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. Kappa densetsu 河童伝説, Kappa minwa 河童民話 - Legends - Introduction .
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- Kappa Legends to explore -

- quote
近藤せいけんによるかっぱのお話。

*** かっぱのお話 ***
①相模川の河童
②太郎河童の夢
③相模のかっぱ漬け
④河童のお使い
⑤相模の河童さくらの宴へ
⑥相模の河童まつり
⑦相模の河童まつり宴たけなわ
⑧相模の河童村 三流
⑨河童の名工 甚五郎
⑩名工甚五郎とかっぱ堂
⑪太郎河童と小童
⑫かっぱ村三流のお土産
⑬厚木宿のかっぱ屋
⑭かっぱのなみだ 1 Kappa no namida - tears of Kappa

中津川の鮎姫
小鮎川のかっぱと白龍
*** かっぱの詩 ***
かっぱ音頭
かっぱサンバ

- the hyperlinks are here
- source : kindai-karate.jp/minwa_kappa


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. - - - Join my Kappa friends on facebook ! - - - .

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. Kappa densetsu 河童伝説, Kappa minwa 河童民話 - Legends - Introduction .

. - yookai, yōkai 妖怪 Yokai monsters - .


. Legends and Tales from Japan 伝説 - Introduction .

. Mingei 民芸 Regional Folk Art from Japan .

- #kappalegends -
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9/03/2015

Miyazaki Kappa Legends

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- KAPPA 河童 伝説 / かっぱ / カッパ - Legends -
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- Kappa Legends from Miyazaki  河童伝説 - 宮崎県


- KAPPA 河童伝説 - 九州 - Legends from Kyushu -
- Introduction -
Fukuoka / Kagoshima / Kumamoto / Nagasaki / Oita / Saga



CLICK for more photos from Kappa in Kyushu.

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- - - - - In Miyazaki, the Kappa is known by many names locally:

. hyoosubo ヒョウスボ カッパ /兵主坊 Hyosubo .
Suiten 水天, 水神 deity of the water and also deity of the mountains (Yama no Kami 山の神)
ひょうすんぼ Hyosunbo
ひょうすえ Hyosue、ひょうすぼ, ヒョオスボ Hyoosubo、ヒョウスンボ Hyoosunbo、ひょうすんべ Hyoosunbe

ガラッパ Garappa. ガマジロ Gamajiro and ガマジロドン, Gamajiro don, ガオロ Gaoro, ガグレサァ Gaguressa, ガツラ Gatsura, 。ガマッパ Gamappa, ガラッパ Garappa, ガラッポ Garappo, ガランボ Garanbo,
ガワタロ Gawataro, ダワタロオ Gawataroo, カワッパ Kawappa, ガワッパ Gawappa,
カワノトノ Kawa no Ton, ガワロ Gawaro,
スイテンボオズ Suiten Boozu, 。セコボオ Sekoboo,
ガグレ Gagure, ガグレン Gaguren, カリコボウ Karikobo,
ヤマンヒト Yama no Hito (Man of the Mountain) / カワンヒト Kawa no Hito (Man of the River)
カッパワロ Kappawaro

gawa is another reading of kawa, river.




Kappa Iwa 河童岩 The Kappa Rock
Once upon a time
there lived one Kappa in the river. One day many children came to the river to play and threw a white pebble 白い小石 in the water. Now they jumped in and tried to find the white stone.
Suddenly, the Kappa appeared in the water and asked:
"May I become your friend and play with you?"
But the children knew that a Kappa will pull out and eat their anus, so they became afraid and wanted to run away.


Illustration by かわさき えり Kawasaki Eri

But the Kappa called on them:
"Let's have a competition and see who wins. I will give this fish to the winner!"
He showed them a fish on a bamboo skewer.

The rest of the story is here in Japanese
- source : minwa.fujipan.co.jp/area/miyazaki -
宮崎県の昔話
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Karikoboo カリコボウ / かりこ坊 Karikobo, Karkio Bo, the Kappa
Kakariboozu カリコボウズ Kakari Bozu


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In the 米良市 Mera district
かりこ坊 Karikobo is venerated as Yama no Kami 山の神 a deity of the Mountain. He likes to play tricks on people, especially imitating the sound in the forest like cutting a tree or causing a landslide or shooting a hunter's guns. But he never puts humans into real danger. When people hear him making strange sounds, it is best to keep quiet and pretend not to hear anything.

. doshakuzure 土砂崩れ landslide legends .

If you think he is close, he will show up far in the mountain. If you think he is down in the valley, he will shout out high in the moutain.
If he comes close, animals will catch its vibes and become afraid. Dogs and horses are expecially sensitive to his appearance.

He likes to take a bath. If you do not keep the bath water boiling hot, he will sneek into the bathroom. If he has taken a bath in a home, the water becomes all smelly like the toilet.

At the 秋彼岸 Autumn solstice he begins to walk up the mountain ridge (to become Yama no Kami, Deity of the Mountain.
A the 春彼岸 Spring solstice he comes down to the river (to become Kawa no Kami, Deity of the River and Water).

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児湯郡 Koyu district 西米良村 Nishi Mera

Hyosubo ひょすぼ / Hyoosunbo ひょうすんぼ
Once a Samurai killed a かりこ坊 Kariko Bo by accident and burried him secretely.
His wife soon became pregnant, but the child was killed by the Kariko Bo.
A Mountain Priest told them this was the curse of the Mountain Deity, so they built a proper grave 山神塚 for the dead Kariko Bo.


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- reference : nichibun yokai database -



source : fragezeichen.web.fc2.com/mononoke

佐脇嵩之 Sawaki Suoshi (1707 - 1772)

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....................................................................... Miyazaki 宮崎県 

. Kappa and Legends with tofu  豆腐伝説 .
from temple 泉福寺 Zenpuku-Ji, Takachiho

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On the 5th day of the 5th lunar month (Boy's Festival) you have to eat tsunonoboo つののぼう (?角の坊) to prevent water accidents caused by the Kappa.
Once a Kappa invited a farmer to do Sumo wrestling, but the farmer refused, saying he has to go home to eat tsunonoboo. This kept him safe from the mischievious Kappa.


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木城町 Kijo



At the Kawabaru Nature Park かわばる自然公園 is a bronze statue of a Kappa.

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Every year after the autumn equinox the Kappa climbs to the mountain, moaning ピーヒョピーヒョ (piihiyo piihiyo) and playing tricks on the way.
Once he used the bath of a home on his way and people know he was there when the bathwater was all black and smelled terrible. So the farmer captured a monkey and bound him to the bathroom wall 風呂場. The Kappa came at night and was surprized, got angry and shook the house like in an earthquake. Then he left and never came back.

Once there lived a Kappa family near the riverpool. When the farmer gave them three tail hairs of his horse for fishing, the Kappa showed great gratitude to the family.


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Hyoosunbo ひょうすんぼ Hyosunbo

In the year 1489 an ancestor of the 正一家 Masakazu family wanted to cross the river on a horse. A Hyosunbo grabed the tail of the horse and to get rid of him he had to cut off the right arm and take it home. Later the Hyosunbo came to his house and asked for his arm back. To show his gratitude he showed the family how to make medicine using the bark of the mountain peach tree (yamamomo 山桃の木, Myrica rubra), 茶の葉 tea leaves and もち米 mochigome sticky rice. This powerful medicine heals broken bones, bruises and even stomach ailments.
The family brings ritual sake and thank-you offerings to the river every year on the last day of december.


Hyosunbo, this is a Yokai monster with the name Hyoosube ひょうすべ Hyosube
ひょうすえ Hyosue、ひょうすぼ Hyoosubo、ヒョウスンボ Hyoosunbo、ひょうすんべ Hyoosunbe

. Hyōzu 兵主神 Hyozu no Kami .
and
兵主部 Hyōsube the Yokai Monster


and a strong liquor with this name 芋焼酎 ひょうすんぼ
from 松露酒造 Shoro Shozo / 宮崎県串間市




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清武町 Kiyotake - Ioya Kiyotakechō Funahiki

The company 庵屋の北山様 Kitayama sama from Ioya venerated the Kappa.
Once a villager had shot a Kappa carrying some cucumbers. But afterwards that man got ill himself and died.
So now they venerate the Kappa.

In a pond with cold water in the dark forest below a sanctuary there lives a Kappa.

There is also a liquor made in Kiyotake, with the name
Kappa no sasoi-mizu 河童の誘い水 "water to invite a Kappa".



宮崎県宮崎市清武町加納甲2677−1

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上使橋 Joshibashi

The Kappa from the bridge Joshibashi tried to pull a horse into the river but got caught.


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宮崎市 Miyazaki town

A Kappa from the waterway of 松井いぜき / 井堰 Matsui Izeki had come to a farmhouse to get the liver of a horse. But two strong men named 太吉 Takichi and 次郎 Jiro made sure the Kappa did not come.



松井用水路 / いぜき waterways and seki せき(堰) weirs along the river 清武川 Kiyotakegawa.
This has been constructed by the official 松井五朗兵衛 Matsui Gorobei from 飫肥 Obi around 1643 to gain farmland for the poor villagers.


source : Kyushu regional agricaltual administration office

In 1934 the weir had been rebuilt in concrete.


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西臼杵郡 Nishiusuki 高千穂町 Takachiho

On the border of Kumamoto, Oita and Miyazaki there is upstream the shrine 川上神社 Kawakami Jinja.
Once a Kappa came to the priest Ando 安藤氏 and asked to remove the Yatsume 八つ目のもの. The priest demanded in return that the Kappa would not take away the children of the village any more and then let him go.
The Yatsume was in fact the harrow used for preparing the rice fields 馬鍬. To show his gratitude the Kappa brought fresh fish every day.
But one day, when the priest had forgotten to take away his knife at the fish deposit, the Kappa did not come any more. And children began to have water accidents again. Therefore priest Ando took his knife again and cut off the arm of the Kappa. This arm is still in the possession of the temple to our day - or so they say.

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川太郎湯 Kawataro Yu in Takachiho

Once people dug a dent into the riverbed, stopped the water into a pool and threw hot stones in it for a bath. Then suddenly a Kappa also slipped into the hot water and in no time the water became lukewarm. But this "hot spring" is said to heal all kinds of ailments.


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高鍋町 Takanabe

In the garden of 鴫野の水神様 the Water Deity of Shigino a Kappa came for a complaint.
The horse of the deity had been to the river nearby and bitten off the arm of the Kappa.
After a discussion they burried it near Mount Utonoyama ウトノヤマ, a place rather dark even in daytime. Now the Kappa came back every day to ask for his arm and eventually they showed him the place. Since then the Kappa never showed up again.


There are also ひょうすん坊 Hyosunbo legends in Takanabe.
高鍋ひょうすんぼ伝説
There is also a pub called like this 「ひょうすんぼ」という居酒屋
and a Hyosunbo road with many Kappa statues called 「ひょうすんぼ通り」


statue at Hyosunbo Road

Takanabe is next to 木城町 Kijo town.

Once upon a LONG time,
there lived a good priest and his young acolyte in the temple Enpuku-Ji 宮田の円福寺 . . .

- and another legend

むか~しむかし、 Once upon a LONG time,
木の瀬の小丸川河原は ものすごく川幅の広い瀬になってました。
しかも水がとてもキレイで、川遊びのメッカになってました。
大人も子供も 魚を取ったり水遊びしたり、それは大賑わいだったそうです。
- source : miyazaki-cci.or.jp/takanabe -



Hyosunbo Kappa Kokeshi ひょうすんぼ


source : kappauv.com kokeshi


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- - - - - reference - - - - -
- source : Yokai Database -

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. - - - Join my Kappa friends on facebook ! - - - .

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- KAPPA 河童 / 合羽 / かっぱ / カッパ - Legends -
- Introduction -

. Legends and Tales from Japan 伝説 - Introduction .

. mukashibanashi 昔話 folktales - Introduction .
the distinction to legends is sometimes blurred.


. Kappa ishi 河童石 Kappa stone legends
Kappa iwa かっぱ岩 Kappa boulder, Kappa rock .



. Mingei 民芸 Regional Folk Art from Japan .

- #kappamiyazaki #miyazakilegends #hyosunbo -
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8/19/2015

Kaido roads yurei yokai

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- KAPPA - 河童 / かっぱ / カッパ - ABC-Index -

. - yookai, yōkai 妖怪 Yokai monsters - .
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- Kaido Ancient Roads - Yokai and Yurei 街道の妖怪 - 幽霊 -



Japan developed a nationwide network of roads and highways already in the 7th century to carry things on foot, horseback, and wheeled traffic and to transport goods between towns and villages. The major roads, called kaido, started from the capital in Kyoto.

. 日本の街道 Kaidoo The Ancient Roads of Japan .

Along the roads there developed a lot of monsters and ghosts . . .

- under construction -
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- - - - - from North to South - - - - -

北海道 樺太 Hokkaido / Sakhalin

ケナシコルウナルペ
イワイセポ
アルサラウス
ミンツチノトノ
ヤカラカムイトノ、
シラルポンチャチャ
オパスホロケウポ
ケムラムカムイ

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東山道 Tosando

磐州 Banshu Fukushima 福島県
麻積婆、泥鰌娘、かすごうじの乙姫、七曲坂の鬼、橙色の飛物、猫の御新造

江州 Eshu Shiga 滋賀県
南覚花、影向杉、お鍋松の蛇、茄子婆、腥地蔵

岩州 Ganshu Fukushima 福島県
てんころりん、魂の鳩、丸山のおさん、朱の盤、布引山の蛇

飛州 Hishu Gifu 岐阜県
千光寺の鐘、大きな岩魚、南瓜蛇、鼠石、天狗髭、豆梅坊の火

上州 Joshu Gunma 群馬県
黒鼬、おぼ、大馬神、権現沼、けろけろ、くだん、赤い巾着、洗濯婆、蜘蛛が淵の主、鬼の遊び場のお婆
. kawa tengu 川天狗 "river Tengu" .

陸奥 Mutsu Aomori 青森県
さだ、臼背負、三毛猫の婆様、人形の坊様、てん転ばし、茶殻子、左京沼の主

濃州 Noshu Gifu 岐阜県
関の太郎、狗賓の鼻息、元正狐、袋被せ、遣ろか水、ついたか見てくろ

陸中 Rikuchu Iwate 岩手県
ぬえ Nue、釜歌、谺、小松の姫、 六兵衛岩、ぼこ

陸前 Rikuzen Miyagi 宮城県
大海老、ざんびき童、ねんねんぐ、唸り坂の大獺、もぞこい

信州 Shinshu Nagano 長野県
両葉芒、このこに困る、空木岳の鹿、甘酒婆、薬缶吊

羽後 Ugo Akita 秋田県
紺絣の化物、狐巡査、丈高女、小又の親杉、ふふぎの貝、生垣揺、林檎怪

羽前 Uzen Yamagata 山形県
おわおわ鳥、二度びっくり、針雑魚、釜っこ下がり、付句の執念、しょけら

野州 Yashu   Ibaraki 栃木県
飛銚子、金色姫、三本杉の精、高鳥山の大亀


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東海道 Tokaido

尾州 Bishu Aichi 愛知県
長田蟹、衣太郎狐、かわらんべの娘、大女、姫取ヶ池の妖怪、化道蜘蛛、土鴉

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房州 Boshu Chiba 千葉県
雷鼬
熊野の三太郎
紫池の主
海入道

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. Bushu 武州 : Tokyo 東京都、Chiba 千葉県、Saitama 埼玉県 - Edo 江戸 .

kuchisake onna 口裂け女 slit-mouthed woman
haifuri tanuki 灰降狸 the ash-throwing Tanuki
isogashi いそがし "busy busy" 
kioicho no densha 紀尾井町の電車 the train from Kioi village
kurokamikiri 黒髪切 black hair cutter
onimusume, oni-musume 鬼娘 demon daughter
ooji no kitsune 王子の狐 the Fox from Oji
ooki na otoko 大きな男 the huge man
tachifusagari たちふさがり twister, whirlwind

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遠州 Enshu Shizuoka 静岡県、Aichi 愛知県

山住さん
大人淵の竜
田中の火の玉
川猿 - Kappa
夜なき婆

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賀州 Gaishu Mie 三重県

鐘喰虫
狒々猿

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常州 Joshu Ibaragi 茨城県

いくち
ぞくぞく
狢雪洞
臼子

甲州 Koshu Yamanashi 山梨県
赤牛、怠け神、治部虫、追分の唐蜀黍、ゆきおに、笠借狐、小豆そぎ婆

三州 Sanshu Aichi 愛知県
笛場怪、孫八狐、雌岩雄岩、大鰻魚、おぶめ塚、片脚上臈、二竜松の精

勢州 Seishu Mie 三重県
すててぎてぎよ、人鬼、水鼬、蛍の幽霊、かっち鮫、父ヶ谷の牛鬼

志州 Shishu Mie 三重県
黒森の鬼、山椒びらし、かんころぼし、蒟蒻虫

総州 Soshu Chiba 千葉県、Ibaraki 茨城県
利根川の大鯉、隠し婆、金網、禿切小僧、山のおばけ、大唐が鼻の化物

相州 Soshu Kanagawa 神奈川県
お宮の化物、おさよならい、おはんさん、釣瓶坂、土用坊主、お化け梟

駿州 Sunshu Shizuoka 静岡県
宇津の谷の鬼、白鳥山の白坊主、なめだら牛、千本の化物、五色蔦の精

豆州 Zushu - Izu - Shizuoka 静岡県
狩野の古釜、大滝の主、天狗の蜜柑、乳っこ担ぎ


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北陸道 Hokurikudo

越後 Echigo Nigata 新潟県

dannasama 旦那様
kangirikko 禿切子
Kappa no onna 河童の女 female Kappa from the river 糸魚川 Itoigawa
toofuneko 豆腐猫 Tofu Cat
shirotsubu 白田螺 white Tanishi mud snail
yama kara kei 山から鶏
yokizutzu hebi 横筒蛇
yoru no mimizu 夜蚯蚓

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越前 Echizen Fukui 福井県

bisha ga tsuku びしゃがつく
iburiyama 飯降山
mangabuchi no nushi 馬鍬淵の主
narita なりた
oharugitsune おはる狐 the fox O-Haru
Tengu no unga 天狗の浮塵子
tsubaki joro 椿女郎 "camellia prostitute"

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越中 Etchu Toyama 富山県
滑川の大章魚、海の猩々、蟹嫁様、妖鼠、せんぽくかんぽく、くたべ

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加州 Kashu Ishikawa 石川県
大おに、火の玉爺さん、ぼんぼしょ、火取魔、斧坂の化物、長面妖女、ぐず

若州 Nyakushu Fukui 福井県
善徳虫、大青蛙、女郎魚、およね狐

能州 Noshu Ishikawa 石川県
山燈、茶釜下、みずくし、猿鬼、赤蜂、桃ヶ瀑

佐渡 Sado Niigata 新潟県
碁盤波、雪隠鬼、臼負婆、海禿、衾 fusuma


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畿内 Kinai - Kyoto Osaka Nara

城州 Joshu Kyoto 京都府
異電、毛虫の大坊主、片輪車、尻目、辰己大明神、橋姫

河州 Kashu Osaka 大阪府
赤子淵の主、門真のお三、納戸爺さん、芒おばけ、姥が火、悪火

泉州 Senshu Osaka 大阪府
卵の獄卒、土生のおさん

摂州 Sesshu Osaka, Hyogo 大阪府、兵庫県
赤渕、明月姫、目無し稚児、箕面山の天狗、源兵衛狸

和州 Washu Nara 奈良県
破石、鏡池の火の玉、ごんずい、山あらし、金の蛙、べとべとさん、筐転り

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Sanyodo 山陽道

播州 Banshu Hyogo 兵庫県
阿菊虫、とます、淡桃躑躅、菅笠著た子、誰袖坂、蛸山伏

備州 Bishu Okayama 岡山県、Hiroshima 広島県
蜘女房、骨喰猫、おじち山のおさん、西大寺梵鐘、米噛石、生姜の呻声、焚朗火

防州 Boshu Yamaguchi 山口県
八の字狸、二人大坊主、柿の葉の化物、馬糞ヶ岳の大蛇、枇杷精

長州 Choshu Yamaguchi 山口県
お月さんの蜘蛛、ひけ、山みさき、平家蟹

芸州 Geishu Hiroshima 広島県
一本角、七鍋、宮写貝、傾城ヶ淵の主

作州 Sakushu Okayama 岡山県
保木の大蛇、こそこそ、蘇鉄の化物、牛飼いの雲雀、栗姫、宇兵衛どん宇兵衛どん、
杓子岩、樽岩


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山陰道 Sanindo

伯州 Hakushu Tottori 鳥取県
ごいぞう、勝手のええ蜘蛛、銀兜怪、まかげ

因州 Inshu Tottori 鳥取県
甘露落とし、種の藤助の嬶、蛇の医者、囲炉裏の婆

隠岐 Oki Island Shimane 島根県
山姥蜘蛛、魔法飯綱、もた、やさい艪、七尋女房

石州 Sekishu Shimane 島根県
蓑を着た大男、獺の小豆磨、綿売り三匁、菖蒲がさこの婆、菅笠下、女郎虫

丹州 Tanshu (Tanba) Kyoto 京都府
衣章魚、大蛇の姉妹、白い幕、片枝松、渡柄杓、筵の手

但州 Tanshu Hyogo 兵庫県
但馬の大章魚、念仏谷の鼬、こんこんさんの道、井垣甚十郎、辻坊主

雲州 Unshu Shimane 島根県
鎧蛙、壁の上の抜首、飛藁束、鮗の宮、おしみ


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南海道 Nankaido - Shikoku

阿州 Ashu Tokushima 徳島県
お福石、天神様の銀杏、鬼飯銭、お芳狸、袖もぎさん、芥子坊主、夜行さん

紀州 Kishu Wakayama 和歌山県
海犬、目塗り、子犬のようなもの、小原淵の竜女、平家の旗竹、岩の侍

讃州 Sanshu (Sanuki) Kagawa 香川県
おしょぼ、高壁、大鰈、狸の石、蛇の目傘の呵々、高松の怪魚、亀蛭子、猫の外道

淡州 Tanshu Hyogo 兵庫県
しとりの池の大蛇、安乎の海坊主、かりかり

土州 Toshu Tosa Kochi 高知県
しばてん、羽指鯨、狸の自転車、山父、箸舐兎、手杵返、おちちんぷんぷん、山鰐

予州 Yoshu Ehime 愛媛県
おやま女郎、隠神刑部、牛鬼、砂洗い、風ぶれ

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西海道 Saikaido - Kyushu

豊州 Bushu Oita 大分県
鬼新太夫、法螺の貝、八幡の森の鬼、鼬の塗壁、兄弟割石、ひとだま、空木返し、ししこり

筑州 Chikushu Fukuoka 福岡県
ぼっくりしょ、鼠娘、阿弥陀がむね、御寺の鬼、山神椿、寿命貝、人食い幽霊、めら、山哭、司生虫、

肥州 Hishu - Saga, Nagasaki, Kumamoto 佐賀県、長崎県、熊本県
石渚女、蛸聟殿、野狐小僧、御辛労の池、南蛮井戸、坊様鯨、いでもち、油すまし、一ッちょ目、豆腐娘

壱岐 Iki Island Nagasaki 長崎県
かしゃの雨、塗坊、美しい傘、舟しとぎ、湯坊主

隅州 Gushu Kagoshima 鹿児島県
早馬殿、一反木綿、二反ばえ、おじどん

日州 Hisshu Miyazaki 宮崎県
百椀とどろ、とんごし婆、貧乏枇杷、無いもん食う、むき、ひょうずんぼ

薩州 Sasshu Satsuma Kagoshima 鹿児島県
下い股、火の斎の雉、甕壺の化物、銭排猪、お耳長様   小倉の海女、米蛸、ぬっぺっ坊、このつきとっこう

対州 Taishu Nagasaki 長崎県
蜷割り、十六日烏賊、さすれい、にんじん

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琉球 Ryukyu Kagoshima - Okinawa 鹿児島県 ー 沖縄県

akamataa アカマター dangerous serpent
- source : yokai database -

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dangasamajimun ダンガサマジムン

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kijimunaa キジムナー Kijimuna



The Kijimuna (キジムナー Kijimunaa) are creatures of the mythology native to the island of Okinawa. The kijimuna are small wood spirits according to Okinawan mythology.
They are said to look around three or four years old and have red hair.
- - - More in the WIKIPEDIA !


kenmun 水蝹 Kenmun
a kappa/kijimunaa hybrid
Kenmun are hairy water and tree spirits from the Amami islands in southern Japan.
- reference source : Matt Alt -

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nakanodakarinusuuyooi ナカンダカリヌスーヨーイ

ushinoshita unagu 牛舌女 woman with a bull tongue

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zan ザン
From the Amami islands 奄美諸島



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- source : wakanmomomikan.yu-nagi.com -

幽霊街道 Yurei Kaido
- source : Yokai Database - - 84


. 日本の街道 Kaidoo The Ancient Roads of Japan .
- Introduction -


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. - - - Join my Kappa friends on facebook ! - - - .

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. - yookai, yōkai 妖怪 Yokai monsters - .


. Kappa densetsu 河童伝説, Kappa minwa 河童民話 - Legends - Introduction .


. Minwa 民話 folktales / densetsu 伝説 Japanese Legends .

. Mingei 民芸 Regional Folk Art from Japan .

- #kappakaidoyokai #yokaikaido #kaidoyokai -
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