12/31/2017

Welcome

. Mingei - Japanese Folk Art - TOP .
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- Welcome to the Kappapedia !
河童 / 合羽 / かっぱ / カッパ - Kappa, the Water Goblin of Japan!
River Imp, Water Sprite, River Monster



My Yamashina Daruma and the Kappa Family

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- - - - - Kappa - - - - -
Kappa are supernatural creatures which live both on land and in water. They are as tall as a four or five year old child. They have a beak-like snout, and fins on their hands and feet. They also have a shell on their back, and a water-filled dish on their head. As long as the dish is full of water, kappa keep their supernatural powers. Kappa are known for dragging people into the water and pulling out their livers through their anuses.

Although kappa harm people sometimes, there are also many tales where they have helped people. They are very curious. They often appear in cartoons because of their lovable images.

Kappa love sumo wrestling and cucumbers. That is why cucumber sushi rolls are called "kappa maki". "Okappa" are bobbed hairstyles because they look like the kappa's hairstyles. Kappa are excellent swimmers.
There is a saying "Kappa no kawa nagare (a drowning kappa)" which means, even an expert can make mistakes sometimes.

. Japanese Ghosts and Ghost Stories 怪談 kaidan .



- Satori Kappa 悟り河童 and Dave Dick, Canada -


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- Check this index for the main features a Kappa can take!

. Kappapedia - ABC index .

. - Reference, Books and Links - .





Many types and more names of the kappa


. - yookai, yōkai 妖怪 all kinds of Yokai monsters - .


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. - - - Join my Kappa friends on facebook ! - - - .

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. Regional Folk Toys from Japan .

. Japan - Shrines and Temples .


. Tohoku after the BIG earthquake March 11, 2011

#kappa #kappapedia #darumapedia #kawataro
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- Kappa by Hokusai -


- - - - - Good Bye ! - - - - -


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8/16/2017

onibi demon fire

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. Onipedia - 鬼ペディア - Oni Demons - ABC-List - .
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onibi 鬼火 "demon fire", "devil's fire"

. "devil's fire", onibi 鬼火 Will-o'-the-wisp .
"fox fire", kitsunebi 狐火 (きつねび) //
- kigo for all winter -

. janjanbi じゃんじゃん火 / ジャンジャン火 Janjan fire .
- Legends from Nara

. soogenbi 宗源火 Sogenbi / ubagabi 姥ケ火 / 姥ヶ火 in Kyoto .

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- quote -
Onibi (鬼火) is a type of atmospheric ghost light in legends of Japan. According to folklore, they are the spirits born from the corpses of humans and animals, and are also said to be resentful people that have become fire and appeared. Also, sometimes the words "will-o'-wisp" or "jack-o'-lantern" are translated into Japanese as "onibi."



- Outline
According to the Wakan Sansai Zue written in the Edo Period, it was a blue light like a pine torchlight, and several onibi would gather together, and humans who come close would have their spirit sucked out. Also, from the illustration in the same Zue, it has been guessed to have a size from about 2 or 3 centimeters in diameter to about 20 or 30 centimeters, and to float in the air about 1 or 2 meters from the ground. According to Yasumori Negishi, in the essay "Mimibukuro" from the Edo period, in chapter 10 "Onibi no Koto," there was an anecdote about an onibi that appeared above Hakone mountain that split into two and flew around, gathered together again, and furthermore split several times.
Nowadays, people have advanced several theories about their appearance and features.

- Appearance
They are generally blue as stated previously, but there are some that are bluish white, red, and yellow. For their size, there are some as small as a candle flame, to ones about as large as a human, to some that even span several meters.
- Number
Sometimes there only 1 or 2 of them appear, and also times when 20 to 30 if them would appear at once, and even times when countless onibi would burn and disappear all night long.
- Times of frequent appearance
They usually appear from spring to summer. They often appear on days of rain.
- Places of frequent appearance
They commonly appear in watery areas like wetlands, and also in forests, prairies, and graveyards, and they often appear in places surrounded by natural features, but rarely they appear in towns as well.
- Heat
The are some that, when touched, do not feel hot like a fire, but also some that would burn things with heat like real fire.

- - - - - Types of onibi - - - - -

As onibi are thought of as a type of atmospheric ghost light, there are ones like the below. Other than these, there is also the shiranui, the koemonbi, the janjanbi, and the tenka among others. There is a theory that the kitsunebi is also a kind of onibi, but there is also the opinion that strictly speaking, they are different from onibi.

Asobibi (遊火, lit. "play fire")
It is an onibi that appears below the castle and above the sea in Kōchi, Kōchi Prefecture and Mitani Mountain. One would think that it appeared very close, just for it to fly far away, and when one thinks that it has split apart several times, it would once again all come together. It is said to be of no particular harm to humans.
Igebo
It is what onibi are called in the Watarai District, Mie Prefecture.
Inka (陰火, lit. "shadow fire")
It is an onibi that would appear together when a ghost or yōkai appears.
Kazedama (風玉, lit. "wind ball")
It is an onibi of the Ibigawa, Ibi district, Gifu Prefecture. In storms, it would appear as a spherical ball of fire. It would be about as big as a personal tray, and it gives off bright light. In the typhoon of Meiji 30 (1897), this kazedama appeared from the mountain and floated in the air several times.
Sarakazoe (皿数え, lit. "count plate")
It is an onibi that appeared in the Konjaku Gazu Zoku Hyakki by Sekien Toriyama. In the Banchō Sarayashiki known from ghost stories, Okiku's spirit became appeared as an inka ("shadow fire") from the well, and was depicted as counting plates.
Sōgenbi (叢原火 or 宗源火, lit. "religion source fire")
It was an onibi in Kyoto in Sekien Toriyama's Gazu Hyakki Yagyō. It was stated to be a monk who once stole from the Jizōdō in Mibu-dera who received Buddhist punishment and became an onibi, and the anguishing face of the priest would float inside the fire. The name also appeared in the "Shinotogibōko," a collection of ghost stories from the Edo period.
Hidama (火魂, lit. "fire spirit")
An onibi from the Okinawa Prefecture. It ordinarily lives in the kitchen behind the charcoal extinguisher, but it is said to become a bird-like shape and fly around, and make things catch on fire.
Wataribishaku (渡柄杓, lit. "transversing ladle")
An onibi from Chii village, Kitakuwada District, Kyoto Prefecture (later, Miyama, now Nantan). It appears in mountain villages, and is a bluish white ball of fire that lightly floats in the air. It is said to have an appearance like a hishaku (ladle), but it is not that it actually looks like the ladle tool, but rather that it appeared to be pulling a long and thin tail, which was compared to a ladle as a metaphor.
Kitsunebi (狐火, lit. "fox fire")
It is a mysterious fire that has created various legends, there is the theory that a bone the fox is holding in its mouth is glowing. Kimimori Sarashina from Michi explained it as a refraction of light that occurs near river beds. Sometimes kitsunebi are considered a type of onibi.

- Considerations
First, considering how the details about onibi from eyewitness testimony do not match each other, onibi can be thought of as a collective term for several kinds of mysterious light phenomenon. Since they frequently appear during days of rain, even though the "bi" (fire) is in its name, they have been surmised to be different from simply the flames of combustion, and is a different type of luminescent body. It is especially of note that in the past, these phenomena were not strange.
In China in the BC era,
it was said that "from the blood of human and animals, phosphorus and oni fire (onibi) comes." The character 燐 at that time in China could also mean the luminescence of fireflies, triboelectricity, and was not a word that indicated the chemical element "phosphorus".
Meanwhile, in Japan,
according to the explanation in the "Wakan Sansai Zue", for humans, horses, and cattle die in battle and stain the ground with blood, the onibi are what their spirits turn into after several years and months.
One century after the "Wakan Sansai Zue"
in the 19th century and afterwards in Japan, as the first to speak of them, they were mentioned in Shūkichi Arai's literary work "Fushigi Benmō", stating, "the corpses of those who are buried have their phosphorus turned into onibi." This interpretation was supported until the 1920s, and dictionaries would state this in the Shōwa period and beyond.
Sankyō Kanda,
a biologist of luminescent animals, found phosphorus in 1696, and as he knew that human bodies also had this phosphorus, in Japan, the character 燐 was applied to it, and thus it can be guessed that it was mixed in with the hint from China about the relation between onibi and phosphorus. In other words, it could be surmised that when corpses decay, the phosphorus in phosphoric acid would give off light. In this way, many of the onibi would be explained, but there also remain many testimonies that do not match with the theory that of illumination from phosphorus.
After that,
there is a theory that it is not phosphorus itself, but rather the spontaneous combustion of phosphine, or the theory that it is burning methane produced from the decay of the corpse, and also a theory that hydrogen sulfide is produced from the decay and becomes the source of the onibi, and also ones that would be defined in modern science as a type of plasma. Since they often appear in days of rain, there are scientists that would explain that as Saint Elmo's fire (plasma phenomenon). The physicist Yoshihiko Ōtsuki also advanced the theory that these mysterious fires are caused by plasma.It has also been pointed out that for the lights that would appear far in the middle of darkness, that if they are able to move by suggestion, then there is a possibility that they could simply be related to optical illusion phenomena.
Each of these theories
has its own merits and demerits, and since the onibi legends themselves are of various kinds, it would be impossible to conclusively explain all of the onibi with a single theory.
Furthermore,
they are frequently confused with hitodama and kitsunebi, and as there are many different theories to explain them, and since the true nature of these onibi is unknown, there is no real clear distinction between them.
- reference source : wikipedia -


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す 駿河の北浜 鬼火の怪 - SU - Sugaru no Kitahama - Onibi no Kai
江戸妖怪かるた Edo Yokai Karuta - card game


. Japanese Legends - 伝説 民話 昔話 – ABC-List .

............................................................................ Aichi 愛知県
知多郡 Chita district  南知多町 Minami-Chita

onibi 鬼火,ashioto 足音,hanashigoe 話声,daionkyoo 大音響
尾張高野山岩屋山奥之院は、今昔を問わず修行道場として多くの人が来る。行者はいずれも三日ないし七日間断食又は火のもの断ちして、毎夜十二時から一時にかけて樹木の生い茂る真っ暗がりの堂外の諸仏を巡拝するのだが、その時、大牛が道に横たわり前進を妨げたり、幾十もの鬼火が現れたりして行の邪魔をする。また、数十人の足音や話し声が聞こえたり、屋根に大石が落ちるような大音響などがして、修行の途中で逃げる者もいる。

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- reference : nichibun yokai database 妖怪データベース -
23 to explore (01)

- reference - 鬼火 -

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. - - - Join the Onipedia friends on facebook ! - - - .

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. Onipedia - 鬼ペディア - Oni Demons - ABC-List - .

. Tengu 天狗と伝説 Tengu legends "Long-nosed Goblin" .

. - yookai, yōkai 妖怪 Yokai monsters - .

. Legends and Tales from Japan 伝説 - Introduction .

. Mingei 民芸 Regional Folk Art from Japan .

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- #onibi -
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8/12/2017

Go Nagai Demons

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. Onipedia - 鬼ペディア - Oni Demons - ABC-List - .
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Go Nagai 永井豪 Nagai Go - Demon Paintings



- quote -
Go Nagai
Born under the name Kiyoshi and growing up in a somewhat large family (he was 4th out of 5 brothers), Go Nagai has went from college student to internationally famous and genre creating integral piece of anime history.

Demons (デーモン, demon, or 悪魔, akuma)
or sometimes known as Devils, show up many times in Go Nagai's works, especially in the series Devilman, Demon Lord Dante, and Devil Lady. They are powerful beings with unique abilities and appearances.



- History
Demons ruled the earth in the ancient past millions of years ago. Living off their instincts they slaughtered one another for the sake of power. God came to exterminate the race from the Earth and sent his Angels to do so. Satan felt pity for the Demons and rebelled against God to save them. After a long battle the Demons were sent into hibernation until the time came for them to rise up and defeat God in the final battle. After they awoken they find pests called humans to have conquered their Earth. Therefore Satan and the Demons declare war on the humans. In Demon Lord Dante the Demons were the first intelligent tribe of humans to establish themselves on the prehistoric Earth. Using technology they fused themselves with machinery and dinosaurs to become the Devils they are today.

- Biology
Proned to violence Demons are aggressive towards all living creatures, including other Demons. This is because whenever a Demon kills another creature he merges with their body and takes over their mind. All their powers and knowledge become one with the Demon. Inanimate objects can also be used in the construction of the Demon's body, such as rocks, missiles, and guns.Humans on the other hand are harder to control because of reason. Therefore a Black Sabbath must be invoked where the humans run off on instinct, if not a Demon trying to merge with a human dies along with it's host. However if a human with a pure heart is invaded by a Demon the Demon's soul is suppressed and the human obtains the Demon's body and powers without losing himself, thus becoming Devilmen.

- Gallery of his demon paintings
April 27 2009
- source : gonagai.wikia.com/wiki/... -


永井豪 Nagai Go
永井潔(ながい きよし)Nagai Kiyoshi (1945年9月6日 - )
- - - More in the WIKIPEDIA !



CLICK for more manga Demon paintings.


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. - - - Join the Onipedia friends on facebook ! - - - .

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. Onipedia - 鬼ペディア - Oni Demons - ABC-List - .

. Tengu 天狗と伝説 Tengu legends "Long-nosed Goblin" .

. - yookai, yōkai 妖怪 Yokai monsters - .

. Legends and Tales from Japan 伝説 - Introduction .

. Mingei 民芸 Regional Folk Art from Japan .

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- #gonagai #nagaigo #devilman -
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oni ni naru become demon

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. Onipedia - 鬼ペディア - Oni Demons - ABC-List - .
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oni ni naru 鬼になる to become a demon

When someone dies with a grudge or unfinished business in this world, he might become an Oni and carry on . . .
Some souls become yuurei 幽霊 Yurei ghosts.
In other social circumstances, it becomes necessary to turn into an Oni (devil's advocate) right away . . .

Not all Oni are bad, destructive, eating humans or causing much harm and trouble.
Some are quite nice, kind, helpful and benevolent.

. Benevolent and helpful Oni Demons 優しい鬼 yasashii oni .


. matagi 又鬼 / マタギ bear hunters .
- - - mata oni ni naru 又鬼 "I have to become a demon again"




He who eats human meat will become an Oni ? ???


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鬼になる器なれない器 ― 企業で勝ち上がる・独立するための34章
To be able to become an Oni or not - 34 chapters to survive in business and become independent
里中李生 Satonaka Risho
- - - - - Contents
第1部 勝ち上がりたいなら、鬼になれ
サディズム無き者は去れ/給料をむさぼる「サル」になっていないか/三くだり半を突きつける「客」たち/"癒し"という罠に、はまっていないか/バブル入社組よ、弱者の幻影にすがるな

第2部 女人に対し鬼になれるか
"膣外射精"の屈辱を卒業しろ/まず、財布は"女人禁制"から始めよ/"パチンコ主義"では一生貧乏だ/年金国家に裏切られない法/所得が少ない時はどう切り抜けるのか

第3部 快楽を極める鬼になれ
快適を求めずして、大成功なし/大金を動かす緊張と快楽を知れ/あなたの成功を完成させる「妄想」とは?/20代で磨かれる、これだけの感性/決してあなたが命を賭けてはいけない会社

第4部 あなたが鬼才を発揮するために
逆転人生へ導く「才能開花」とは何か/"鬼才"のきっかけは、こう作れ/友人を切り離す快楽を知っているか/クビ切り時代こそ、電脳武装せよ/トヨタ神話に追随してはいけない理由

第5部 己れの道は鬼に通ず
リーダーたるもの、札付きのワルであれ/「出来損ない」の可能性に賭けてみよ/あなたの仕事、こう考えてみよ/こんな男とだけは決して付き合うな/こんな女だけは絶対近づけるな

第6部 信念なくして鬼才にあらず
私が会社をやめた理由/マンネリの宿命は、こう克服せよ/ファストフード主義では一流になれない/エディプスコンプレックス無き者は去れ/偽りのダンディズムを卒業しろ

第7部 鬼の道は独立にあり
今すぐ「プレッシャーの鬼」となる法/恐慌なくして大成功なし~「ナイスショット」を叫べ~/リストラ・倒産にあったら、必ずするべきこと/孤独・平凡こそを成功の王道とせよ~サラリーマン解放論~


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- kisai 鬼才 genius, "demon genius"


source : 16.tok2.com/home/ichinose... 一ノ瀬芳翠


. demon genius painter 河鍋暁斎 Kawanabe Kyosai .

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. kijin 鬼人 / onibito オニビト "human demon" .


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. Japanese Legends - 伝説 民話 昔話 – ABC-List .

Many humans turned Oni have a red face and some have an iron ring on the head.
Anyway, they all have fearful features.

............................................................................ Fukushima 福島県
二本松市 Nihonmatsu

. 安達が原の鬼女 Adachigahara Woman Demon, 鬼婆 Onibaba .
haunting the area of 黒塚 Kurozuka


............................................................................ Gifu 岐阜県
郡上郡 Kujo district

When the owner of a cat dies, the cat may become an Oni. But if the Buddhist priest performs special rites with his rosary and ritual fan, the cat will come back to itself.

............................................................................ Kagoshima 鹿児島県

姉弟二人のうち弟がいなくなった。集落の人が弟は鬼になって山にいると言うが、姉は信じようとしない。握り飯に針をさしたものを作り、それを食べるなら鬼だと教えられその通りにすると、全部おいしいといって食べた。姉は本当だと信じ、逃げると鬼が追いかけてきたが裏白のしげみにかくれて難を逃れた。また、ススキの根の赤いのは鬼の血だともいう。

............................................................................ Kumamoto 熊本県

If people hit a tea bowl, the gaki 餓鬼 hungry demons will come together. And maybe this person will become an Oni himself.


............................................................................ Kyoto 京都府

. Hashihime, Hashi Hime 橋姫 / はし姫 "Princess of the Bridge" .

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soogenbi 宗源火 Sogenbi  / ubagabi 姥ケ火 / 姥ヶ火
A 幽霊 ghost does not necessarily appear in the shape of a human being. Some become a bird, rat, insect or other animal,
and some become an Oni.
In the district of 京都西院 Saiin this is called Sogenbi fire or Ubagabi fire.
It is a kind of Onibi 鬼火 Demon Fire.



The ubagabi (姥ヶ火or 姥火,lit. "old woman's fire")
is an atmospheric ghost light told about in legends in the Kawachi Province (now Osaka Prefecture) and Tamba Province (now northern Kyoto Prefecture). They are mentioned in old litreature, such as the Tenpō period book the Shokoku Rijin Dan (諸国里人談) and Ihara Saikaku's collection of miscellaneous tales the Saikaku Shokoku Banashi (西鶴諸国ばなし) as well as Edo period kaidan books such as the Kokon Hyaku Monogatari Hyōban (古今百物語評判'), the Kawachi Kagami Meishōki (河内鑑名所記), and Toiryama Sekien's collection of yōkai depictions, the Gazu Hyakki Yagyō, among other mentions.
- According to the Shokoku Rijin Dan, on a rainy night, in Hiraoka, Kawachi (now Higashiōsaka, Osaka Prefecture), it would appear as a ball of fire with a length of one shaku (about 30 centimeters). It's said that in the past, an old woman stole oil from the Hiraoka Shrine and became a mysterious fire from a resulting curse.



Sōgenbi (叢原火 or 宗源火, lit. "religion source fire")
It was an onibi in Kyoto in Sekien Toriyama's Gazu Hyakki Yagyō. It was stated to be a monk who once stole from the Jizōdō in Mibu-dera who received Buddhist punishment and became an onibi, and the anguishing face of the priest would float inside the fire. The name also appeared in the "Shinotogibōko," a collection of ghost stories from the Edo period.
- MORE in the wikipedia -

. onibi 鬼火 - Will-o'-the-wisp - kitsunebi 狐火 "fox fire" .


............................................................................ Nagano 長野県
下伊那郡 Shimo-Ina district  阿智村 Achi

Is someone walks between the pine branches of a New Year decoration of 門松 Kadomatsu, he will turn into an Oni.


............................................................................ Nara 奈良県

. Ipponashi, the horse of Yoshitsune 一本足は義経の馬 .

- - - - - 猪笹王 (イノザサオウ) King Inozasa-O became an Oni
Inozasa was a huge wild boar living at 伯母峰峠 Obamine Toge pass in Nara. One day it was shot by the hunter
射場兵庫 Iba Hyogo. Tte Wild boar's 亡霊 ghost soul went to Kishu (Wakayama), to 湯の峰の温泉 the hot spring Yunomine and shape-shifted into a wandering Samurai, to heal his wounds. When the owner of the lodging peeked into the room at night, he saw a huge wild boar spread all over the floor. Later the ghost soul became 一本足の鬼 an Ippondatara Oni with one leg. It went back to Obamine and begun to feed on travelers.
Saint Tansei 丹誠上人 could finally appease the soul. But every year on the 20th day of the 12th lunar month,
the day when all appeased Oni become free for one day, it could come back to this world.
This day is called
. hate no hatsuka 果ての二十日 the final day 20 of the year .


source : tyz-yokai.blog.jp/archives....

猪笹王[いのささおう] Inosasa-O

- another version of this legend:
source : vill.kamikitayama.nara.jp/kanko...

. Ippondatara いっぽんだたら in Totsukawa village, Nara .



............................................................................ Niigata 新潟県
十日町市 Tokamachi town 松代町 Matsushiromachi

Seijuuroo セイジュウロウ Seijuro
In the hamlet of 池尻集落 Ikejiri lived a man called Seijuro. One evening he heared a voice at the door calling "Hello, Good evening!" and when he opened, he was kidnapped by 魔物 an ogre.
One year later he came back, but by then he had become an Oni.


............................................................................ Okayama 岡山県
新見市  Niimi

. Shuten Dooji 酒呑童子 Shuten Doji "Sake Child" Demon .
- legend from the hamlet下熊谷 Shimokumatani in Niimi.


............................................................................ Wakayama 和歌山県

. Hyooze no Matsuwaka 兵生の松若と伝説 Matsuwaka from Hyoze .
Hyoze is a small hamlet in Wakayama, bordering to Nara, in the 果無山脈 Hatenashi mountain range and
near 安堵山 Mount Andosan.


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- reference : nichibun yokai database 妖怪データベース -

- reference - 鬼になる -

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. Legends and Tales from Japan 伝説 - Introduction .

. Mingei 民芸 Regional Folk Art from Japan .

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8/06/2017

Shinto and Oni

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Shinto and Oni Demons 神道と鬼

. kami 神 Shinto deities / Japanese gods .
kami to oni 神と鬼 the Deities and Demons of Japan

. torii no oniko 鳥居の鬼コ Demons of the Shinto Toorii gates .
..... 鬼子 - also read as kishi and onigo

. jinja - list of Shinto shrines with ONI . *


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- quote -
Oni
A misshapen supernatural demon or devil visiting this world from the other world, bringing with it disaster or blessing. Due to their fearful spiritual power, oni were considered ambivalent beings possessing the power of both good and evil, and were thus the objects of both worship and avoidance. While the character for oni was read in China as gui and referred to the soul of a deceased person, it was read in Japan variously as oni (demon), mono (an indwelling spirit), or kami.

Based on the salient characteristics of beliefs about oni, the concept of oni can be classified into three main types:
(1) wicked spirits or evil kami,
(2) oni as foreigners or strangers, and
(3) oni as good kami.
The first type bring disaster, death, and plague, and initially were considered invisible beings, but later came to have visible forms. The Nihongi notes the practice of using peaches to ward off oni, a reflection of Chinese beliefs that peaches possessed the power to control noxious spirits and demons. Other expressions found include ashikimono ("evil spirits") and matsurowanukami ("unruly kami"), terms which are believed to refer to evil kami or the tutelaries of people who opposed kingly authority in ancient times.

In contrast, the Nihon ryōiki relate incidents of demons (mono) which caused insanity, and the "evil spirit of a slave" (ashiki yatsu no reiki) which caused death. In short, such expressions referred to departed spirits which had become oni and brought curses upon those still living. Such oni were believed to be the spirits of persons who carried resentments or malice during their lifetime; the spirits or ghosts of malicious or jealous women were thought to be particularly capable of becoming the female demons called hannya. Other demons included deniziens of hell, the bull-headed gozu and the horse-headed mezu.

According to Zeami's Fushikaden, oni appearing in Noh drama are either vengeful spirits (onryō) who possess human beings, or demons of hell. As the visible forms of oni were represented as misshapen and weird beings, popular iconography of oni was influenced by graphic portrayals of hell demons and , gaki, "hungry ghosts,"
as well as by the four-eyed Chinese zhuīnuó (Jp. tsuina) masks worn by the demon exorcists called
fangxiàng (Jp. hōsōshi).

Such rites of "demon exorcism" or tsuina were incorporated into the Buddhist rites of Shushōe and Shunie  (Omizutori) held early in the New Year; these rites featured exorcisms of demons using the power of Buddhist tutelaries such as Bishamon and heavenly bodhisattvas (hiten). These rites became popular observances on the last day of winter (setsubun), and resulted in the formation of stereotypical demon images such as Shutendōji.

A second type of oni is represented by marginalized persons, including foreigners, rebellious indigenous peoples, people drifting ashore in Japan, itinerant performers, religious thaumaturges, rebels, pirates, and mountain dwellers. According to the Nihongi, people thought to have been members of a northern people and called mishihase (or shukushin) were feared as "demons" (oni), and engaged in trade with the Yamato army through a form of Chinese "wordless exchange" which was called kishi  (lit., "demon market").

The Kokoncho monjū (ca. 1254) relates a tale of naked imigrants who came ashore at the island of Okushima in the Izu area, describing them as "demons" with wild hair, round-eyes and tall, dark red bodies. Practitioners of Onmyōdō (Chinese Yin-Yang divination) were likewise viewed as "demon-like" beings since they were believed to control familiar spirits (shikigami) and cast spells.

A third type of demon can be seen in present-day observances of the aforementioned rites of Shushōue and Shunie, and popular rites around the New Year. For example, the "Flower Festival" (Hanamatsuri) held in Shidara, Aichi Prefecture features dancers called "Sakaki-oni" which invoke blessings by stamping the ground and chasing away evil spirits.
Another example would be the visiting kami called namahage in Akita, represented by costumed performers wearing demon masks.
- source : Kawamura Kunimitsu, Kokugakuin -


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- - - - - Glossary - - - - -

ashikimono 悪しき者 evil spirit
ashiki yatsu no reiki 悪しき奴の霊気

. gaki 餓鬼 "The Realm of Hungry Ghosts" .

. Gozu 牛頭 / Gozu Tennō 牛頭天王 .

. Hannya 般若 Hanya demon masks .

. hiten 飛天 flying Apsaras, divine nymphs .

matsurowanu kami まつろわぬ神 unruly Kami . 不順(まつろ)わぬ鬼神

mishihase 粛慎(しゅくしん、みしはせ、 あしはせ (or shukushin)

. Mezu, Gozuki Mezuki 牛頭鬼馬頭鬼 .

. Namahage なまはげ - ナマハゲ in Akita .

. onryoo 怨霊 / goryoo 御霊 "vengeful spirits" .
- Goryoo Matsuri 御霊祭 Goryo Festival  

. sakaki oni 榊鬼 Sakaki demon . - Aichi

. Shikigami 式神 / シキガミ, Shiki no Kami 式の神 Shiki deity, demon or ghost .
- and Abe no Seimei 阿倍晴明 (921 - 1005) - Onmyo-Do

. Shuten Dooji 酒呑童子 Shuten Doji "Sake Child" Demon .

. tsuina 追儺 "demon exorcism" rituals .
- hoosooshi, hōsōshi 方相氏(ほうそうし)Hososhi, demon exorcist / - Setsubun 節分 - Shushōue and Shunie


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. Legends and Tales from Japan 伝説 - Introduction .

. Mingei 民芸 Regional Folk Art from Japan .

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7/18/2017

Tengu Chiba Legends Masks

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Chiba and its Tengu legends 千葉県と天狗伝説 


Chiba no kotengu 千葉の小天狗 The Small Tengu from Chiba

Chiba Eijiroo 千葉 栄次郎 Chiba Eijiro (1833 - 1862)
A Samurai of the Bakumatsu period. Master of the 北辰一刀流 Hokushin Ittoryu School of Swordsmanship.
He studied with his father, 千葉周作 Chiba Shusaku, and became so proficient, he was called "Small Tengu" at age 19.


千葉栄次郎 - 隊士図鑑

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嶺岡浅間の天狗面 Mineoka Asama Tengu Masks
The Mineoka Mountain District ( 嶺岡山地 Mineoka sanchi).
Mount Mineoka Asama is 336 m high. On its North-Eastern side is a temple housing 白滝不動 Shirataki Fudo and the stone Tengu masks are close to it.


source : toki.moo.jp/gaten.. gate 507...

The stone Tengu on the way have some strange forms, with a protruding mouth and a nose like a dumpling.
The locals call them 石尊山 Sekison San - Venerable Stone Deities .



There are three sanctuaries for the stone Tengu on the way up to Mount Mineoka Asama.







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Sekison San 石尊山 Venerable Stone Deities
The belief in Sekison San is known in the Tanzawa mountains, Oyama and at 富士山新五合目小御岳石尊 the 5th station of Mount Fujisan,
石尊様 Sekison Sama are also venerated in Gunma, 甘楽郡 Kanragun 南牧村 Nanmoku village.


Sekison and Fudo Myo-O at 小畑池 Obataike,銚子 Choshi, Chiba

. . . CLICK here for more Sekison Photos !



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高宕山 Takagoyama - 315 m high
From its peak there is a great view over the Kujukutani mountains, Tokyo Bay and all the way to Mount Fujisan.
Now the center of 県立高宕山自然公園, Takagoyama Prefectural Natural Park in South-central Chiba.


- quote -
Kujukutani 千葉 九十九谷
Kujukutani is the landscape of the row of mountains seen from the Kujukutani Park down from Shiratori Shrine at the southeastern end of Mt. Kano in Kimitsu City, Chiba Pref. The mountains including Mt. Takago are part of Boso Kyuryo (hills).
This picturesque landscape is composed of deep valleys and overlapping mountain ridgelines, which is selected as one of 500 Charming Spots in Boso. Purple mists at dawn or the after grow of a sunset creates a magnificent scene like an ink painting. Especially beautiful is the sea of clouds trailing along the ridgelines and fading out into the air, which can be seen from the late fall to winter.
A poet, Keigetsu Omachi, described it as “the most wonderful sight in the world.” It is said that an artist painter, Kaii Higashiyama, was inspired with this landscape and painted one of his masterpieces, “Afterglow.”
- source : nippon-kichi.jp... -


高宕山源頼朝と天狗面 Takagoyama and the Tengu Mask of Minamoto to Yoritomo
飯縄寺 Iizunadera Temple (Iinawadera)
千葉県いすみ市岬町和泉2935-1 / Chiba, Isumi, Misakichoizumi, 2935-1


source : toki.moo.jp/gaten/851-900..gate888...

Mount Takagoyama is 雨乞いの山 a mountain for rain rituals. At 清滝神社 Kiyotaki Jinja a small shrine the Waterfall Deity is venerated as 高オカミ神 the Mountain Deity.
(The old Kanji for this spelling is rain 雨 on top and below it three open mouths 口. Below it the Kanji for a dragon 龍 - a very complicated Kanji indeed, 高おかみ神.)
Below this shrine is the Kannon hall in a cave, protecting the Tengu masks.
Once upon a long time, Minamoto no Yoritomo had to flee from 小田原の石橋山 the lost battle in Odawara and took refuge here. Yoritomo stayed in the Kannon cave (高宕観音 Takago Kannon) and prayed for the return of his good luck and victory. On the pillars of this cave-hall hang the Tengu masks.

高宕山 The Kanji in the middle, 宕, refers to the cave, and this reminded people of the famous 愛宕山 Atagoyama in Kyoto.
Maybe the Tengu from Atagoyama even came here to visit ? ??

Kuraokami, Takaokami 高おかみ神 , Kuramitsuha Kuraokami no kami, Takaokami no kami
. amagoi 雨乞い rain rituals - Introduction .


淤加美神(おかみのかみ)、または龗神(おかみのかみ) - Okaminokami - 闇龗神と高龗神は同一の神. - Takaokami

- - - More in the WIKIPEDIA !

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観音堂の天狗面 The Tengu Masks of the Kannon-Hall


- quote -
牛若丸と大天狗 Ushiwakamaru and the Dai-Tengu

Iizuna temple is known as the 天狗の寺"Tengu Temple".
People come here to pray fpr fire prevention, safety on the sea, prosperous business and health.
The temple treasure is a wood carving of about 4 m length and 1 m hight by the famous carver 波の伊八 Nami no Ihachi.
It shows 牛若丸と天狗 Ushiwakamaru and the Tengu.
At the 仁王門 Nio-Mon entrance gate is a carving of a Tengu riding the waves.

- - - - - and an amulet to go with it


- reference source : isumi-kankou.com/isumi-kanko...-

. Minamoto no Yoritomo 源 頼朝 . - (1147 – 1199)
founder of the Kamakura Shogunate

. Iizuna Daigongen 飯縄大権現 Izuna Daigongen .

. 飯綱三郎天狗 Izuna Saburo Tengu .
He lives on Mount Iizunayama 飯砂山 / 飯綱山 in Nagano.

. Nami no Ihachi 波の伊八 "Ihachi the carver of waves" .
(1751-1824)
Dragon and waves 竜と波 at temple 飯縄寺 Izunadera.

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. Legends and Tales from Japan 伝説 - Introduction .

験から神主名になった人がいる。ある時2人の兄弟が京に行ったが、弟が行方知れずになった。その後大風が吹いて、杉の上で戻ってきたぞと言う弟の声が聞こえた。狗賓さまとなったこの男は今でも生きている。

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長生郡 Chosei district 長柄町 Nagara town

Someone cut the weeds below the 天狗の腰かけ松 Pine of the Tengu. The Tengu got angry, abducted him and when the man came back, he had a bad injury.
. Tengu no koshikake matsu 天狗の腰掛松 / Tengu no matsu 天狗の松 .
. . . . .

Aoso sama 青麻様 "Green Hemp Deity"
The protecting deity of the 鹿間家 Shikama family is Aoso Sama, said to be a Tengu. He protects from 中風 palsy. Its annual rituals are on the first of April and September.
The offering is red rice and never pumpkin or leek, since he does not like these vegetables.
. . . . .

A child once saw a Tengu on the bridge of 東茂原 Higashi Mobara. Soon after the child got ill and died.
.
A Tengu once shape-shifted and worked at a temple in I市原 chihara town. When the priest asked him to get some Tofu he flew all the way to Kyoto to buy it.
.
Many Tengu sometimes came to the 権現森 Gongenmori Park and made music with flutes and drums.
(Gongen Mori is a hill in Chiba and is nearby are Nagarayama and Rokujizō. 権現森自然公園.)

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館山市 Tateyama city

At 滝田 Takita there is 天狗の通り道 a Tengu road, where they pass with the most strange sounds when flying past. It is a rather deep forest and sometimes the forest workers, who stay over night in a small hut, can feel it moving and shaking.
. madoo 魔道 - まどう Mado, road where monsters pass .
. . . . .

At the village 平群村 Hegurimura near 岩井 Iwai there lived a Tengu. The warden of the small shrine could tell his temper: On good days the water bucked was filled by the Tengu, on bad days it was empty.
.
A villager from 八束村 Yatsukamura village has seen a Tengu in the mountain forest, reading a book.

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- reference : nichibun yokai database 妖怪データベース -

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. . . CLICK here for Photos !
- reference - 千葉 天狗 伝説-

. Tengu no men 天狗の面 / 天狗面 mask of a Tengu - Introduction .

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. - - - Join my Tengupedia friends on facebook ! - - - .

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. - yookai, yōkai 妖怪 Yokai monsters - .

. Legends and Tales from Japan 伝説 - Introduction .

. Mingei 民芸 Regional Folk Art from Japan .

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7/02/2017

Omagatoki demon dusk

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oomagatoki, Ōmagatoki 逢魔時 / 大禍時 "demon dusk"

. kure 暮れ dusk, nightfall, twilight .
tasogaredoki たそがれどき, 黄昏
In former times there were no street lights and it was difficult to see the faces of people when you walked at nightfall. Still not yet the time for a lantern to find your way. So when people met, they would exchange a greeting:
Taso kare wa? 誰そ、彼は (dare daroo, are wa?) "Who is this?". Taso kare ... became tasogare in the course of time, now loaded with the feeling of loneliness and melancholy.



- quote -
Ōmagatoki - referring to the moment at dusk when the sky grows dark. Opposite of akatsuki (暁) dawn.
It has specific meanings for the two ways of writing it:
first, 逢魔時 "the time of meeting yōkai, yūrei, and dark creatures"; and
second, 大禍時 "the time of great calamity".

In Illustrated One Hundred Demons from the Present and the Past, Toriyama Sekien described ōmagatoki as the time when chimimōryō, the evil spirits of the mountains and rivers, attempt to materialize in the world.



Chimimōryō, chimi mooryoo 魑魅魍魎 Chimi Moryo
is a term, originated from China dating roughly 2,500 years in ancient chronicles such as the Zuo Zhuan, referring to monsters of the mountains and monsters of the rivers. It refers to various kinds of obake and things changed into yōkai.
"chimi" (魑魅) refers to the monsters of the mountains, and
"mōryō" (魍魎) refers to the monsters of the river,
and so the word "chimimōryō" is often used to refer to all monsters of the mountains and rivers. Furthermore, the word "minori" was also used for this. For this to be used to mean a "ripening" (minoru) oni has been used in various regions since ancient times.
..... a 魑 is a mountain god that took on the shape of a tiger, and
..... a 魅 is a swamp or marsh god taking on a shape with the head of a beast, and it is surmised that from this, what the word was seen to mean expanded to encompass beasts of various attributes.
- - - - - Chimi are said to be monsters that come about from strange atmosphere (miasma) in mountains and forests. Taking on an appearance with the face of a human, and the body of a beast, they would perplex humans. In the dictionary Wamyō Ruijushō from the Heian period, they were considered to be a type of oni under the Japanese name 魑魅 / "sudama", and in the Edo period encyclopedia, the Wakan Sansai Zue, they were seen to be mountain gods (Yama-no-Kami).
- - - - - Mōryō were considered to be spirits from mountains and rivers, and trees and rocks. They would come forth from the life energy of mountains, water, trees, rocks, and all kinds of things in nature, and fool humans. Additionally, they are also said to eat the dead, have the appearance of a child, stand on 2 feet, have dark red skin, have red eyes, long ears, beautiful hair, and a voice that resembles that of a human. With this kind of appearance, they are thought to be oni. In the Wakan Sansai Zue, they are considered water gods (Suijin), and in the ancient Chinese book Zuo Zhuan, they are considered to be gods of swamps and marshes.
- reference source : wikipedia -




魑魅魍魎 - 妖怪巡礼怪奇地図
山口敏太郎 Yamaguchi Bintaro (1966 - )
- 北海道・洞爺湖のトッシーを追う 大沼のサイ伝説 毎夜鳴き声がこだまする〝泣き木〝 岩手・座敷わらし伝説 なまはげ伝承の地 青森・キリストの墓 京都・土蜘蛛の塚 安倍清明神社 一条戻り橋 熊本・河童上陸の地 東京・帝都東京妖怪スポット

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. Yama no Kami 山の神 God of the Mountains .

. Mizu no Kami 水の神 God of the Water .

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- - - - - H A I K U - - - - -

卯の花や逢魔時の通り雨
unohana ya oomagatoki no toori-ame

deutzia blossoms -
a passing rain shower
at demon dusk


Naitoo Toten 内藤吐天 Naito Toten (1900 - 1976)

. u no hana, unohana 卯の花 deutzia blossoms .
- kigo for early summer -

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逢魔時色褪せし薔薇に雨灑ぐ
oomagatoki iro-aseshi bara ni ame sosogu

demon dusk -
rain splatters on the roses
with faded colors


Naitoo Toten 内藤吐天 Naito Toten (1900 - 1976)



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Chimi Mouryou - webcomic by Rasenth


source : cmmr.smackjeeves.com


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. Tengu 天狗と伝説 Tengu legends "Long-nosed Goblin" .

. - yookai, yōkai 妖怪 Yokai monsters - .

. Legends and Tales from Japan 伝説 - Introduction .

. Mingei 民芸 Regional Folk Art from Japan .

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6/26/2017

Tengu from Chichibu

[ . BACK to DARUMA MUSEUM TOP . ]
. Tengupedia - 天狗ペディア - Tengu ABC-Index .
- for Oni from Chichibu, see below.
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Chichibu no Tengu 秩父の天狗さま The Tengu from Chichibu


- Chichibu-Tama-Kai National Park -

The mountainous Chichibu region of Saitama is close to Tokyo, yet full of local lore and color.

. Chichibu Yomatsuri 秩父夜祭 Night Festival .

. Mitsumine Jinja 三峰神社 Shrine and Wolf Legends .

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- quote
Chichibu - By Sumiko Enbutsu
Tengu Matsuri in November
O-Tengu-Sama (Folk Kabuki) at Kidama Jinja, Tsuyagi
Tengu-ya (noodle shop)
..... Legends abound in rural areas of mysterious happenings attributed to Tengu: chopping sounds at midnight, as if trees were being felled .....
- source : books.google.co.jp/books


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In Chichibu, the Tengu is seen as a
mountain deity, Tengu-Shin 天狗神 Tengu-Kami, Tengu God.

- quote -
A later version of the Kujiki (? Kojiki), an ancient Japanese historical text, writes the name of Amanozako,
a monstrous female deity born from the god Susanoo's spat-out ferocity, with characters meaning
tengu deity (天狗神).
The book describes Amanozako as a raging creature capable of flight, with the body of a human, the head of a beast, a long nose, long ears, and long teeth that can chew through swords. An 18th-century book called the Tengu Meigikō (天狗名義考) suggests that this goddess may be the true predecessor of the tengu, but the date and authenticity of the Kojiki, and of that edition in particular, remain disputed.
- source : wikipedia -


Amanozako 天逆毎(あまのざこ)Goddess of Tengu
- quote -
... she is a female, she is a god, she has a son. Her nicknames reveal how rare those things are: metengu (woman tengu) and tengu kami (tengu god) refer specifically to her; i.e. there aren’t really other female tengu or tengu gods besides her.



I also think she is interesting because while most tengu are considered to be malicious demons lurking in the forests, she is actually revered as a goddess. While it isn’t terribly uncommon to see shrines dedicated to tengu or small tengu cults (think of Sojobo from a few days ago), Amanozako’s story is special in that she interacts with the other gods in heaven. Her myths are not self-contained stories, but play off of the larger pantheon. She was supposedly born out of a chunk of spit and gall that the temperamental storm god, Susanoo, vomited up. Most tengu don’t have that as a claim to fame!
- source : yokai.com/amanozako -

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. reference by Toyota Toki とよた 時 / 画房【とよだ 時】 Toyoda Toki .
Manga Painter of Satoyama Japan

In Chichibu, the Tengu is seen as a mountain deity, Tengu-Shin 天狗神 Tengu-Kami.


Kokushidake no Tengu-Iwa 国師岳の天狗岩 Tengu Rock, Tengu Boulder
奥秩父 Oku-Chichibu
Mount Kokushidake is 2591 m high.
Oku Chichibu is located along the border of Saitama, Yamanashi and Nagano. Connecting Nagano and Chichibu is the pass Oodarumi Tooge 大弛峠 Odarumi Pass.

Near Kokushidake is the Tengu One 国師ヶ岳天狗尾根 "Tengu Mountain Ridge", with the Tengu Rock formation. In former times there was the Oku no In Mountain Shrine of 大岳山那賀都神社 Daidakesan Nagato Jinja from Yamanashi (former 三富村 Mitomimura). On top of the rocks is an iron sword, the ご神体 image of the deity.
The formation of the rocks is said to look just like the profile of a Tengu, with a long nose.

Mount Kokushidake was named after priest Musoo Kokushi 夢窓国師 Muso Kokushi.
Around 1330 Muso Kokushi stayed in Yamanashi, 塩山 Enzan at the temple 乾徳山恵林寺 Erin-Ji to make a temple garden (he was a specially gifted garden designer).
The mountain name 大岳山 Daidakesan (Oodakesan) also refers to him.

. Muso Kokushi Soseki 夢窓疎石 (1275 - 1351) .





The deity venerated at this mountain peak is 大山祇神 (おおやまづみのかみ Ooyamazumi no Kami.

. - Ooyamatsuminomikoto 大山祇神, 大山積神, 大山津見神 Oyama Tsumi no Mikoto .

The peak is also venerated by Buddhists, who chant the following when climbing the mountain to pray for good business and protection of the silk industry:
南無大岳那賀都の神社、大山の神、高岡の神、六根清浄.
Namu Daidake Nagato no Jinja , Oyama no Kami, Takaoka no Kami, Rokkon Shojo.



- reference : toki.moo.jp/gaten/251-300/gate264 -

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nokkinboo 破風山のノッキン坊天狗 Nokkinbo Tengu, Nokkin-Bo
ニョッキンボウ Nyokkin-Bo

at Mount Happusan 破風山, 601 m high, Mount Happu, Minano, Saitama.



At the temple 水潜寺 Suisen-Ji, Nr. 34 of the Chichibu Pilgrimage to 34 Kannon Temples, Nokkin-Bo Tengu is venerated as a protector deity.
Nokkin-Bo is ibo no Kami イボの神, a deity to take away warts. The local people came here to worship, bringing some Sake rice wine in bamboo containers. Even nowadays, a lot of "Cup Sake" is offered here.

. 秩父三十四観音霊場 Pilgrimage to 34 Chichibu Kannon Temples .

. ibotori 疣取り / イボ取り / いぼとり take away warts .
ibogamisan いぼ神さん Shinto deity to take away warts / ibotori san いぼとりさ

- reference : toki.moo.jp/inaka-jo/04tengu/15chichib -


- - - - - Closely related to Knokkin-Bo is
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Ryookamisan no Tori Tengu 両神山の刀利天狗 Ryokamisan

Mount Ryokamisan, at the northern end of the Okuchichibu Mountains, is 1,723 m high.
Until recently, women were forbidden to climb this sacred mountain up to the Shrine at its top.



Legend knows that En no Gyoja was the first to climb up here.

Ryookami means "two deities". Here they are
イザナギ(伊弉諾)Izanagi and イザナミ(伊弉冉 Izanami.
. Izanagi 伊弉諾 - 伊弉冉尊and Izanami 伊邪那美命 .

Also known as 八日見山 Yokamiyama, 竜頭山 Ryukamiyama (Dragon Head) and 鋸岳 Nokogiridake.
The name Yokamiyama dates back to Yamato Takeru, who 見 looked this mountain for 八日 eight days when he climbed Mount Tsukuba .
. Yamato Takeru 日本武尊 - Introduction .

The name Ryukami is a pun on the writing 竜神 Dragon God. This deity is known for its eight heads ヤオカミ Yaokami - Yokami.

This mountain is also related to the Tengu
. 六尺坊 Rokushakubo, Rokushaku-Bo .
from Mount 御嶽山 Ontakesan in Kiso.
Other Tengu who live here are
前山 - 三笠山 刀利天坊 Mikasayama - Toriten-Bo
前山 - 八海山 大頭羅坊 Hakkaisan - Daizura-Bo
(摩利支天山 Marishiten Yama) on 阿留摩耶山 the peak Arumayasan アルマヤ坊 Arumaya-Bo

- reference : toki.moo.jp/inaka-jo/04tengu -

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Ryookami Jinja 両神神社 Ryokami Shrine
About half-way up to the summit.


source and more photos : ridgelineimages.com/hiking...

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. Legends and Tales from Japan 伝説 - Introduction .

Tengoo matsuri 天狗祭(テンゴー祭り) Tengo (Tengu) Festival
Tengu is seen as yama no kami 山の神 a Deity of the Mountain
During the festival people pray for safety while working in the mountain forest and blessings for the family.
The main actors of this festival are children.

原の天狗まつり Hara no Tengu Matsuri
秩父市荒川白久(原区)地内 In Hara village



This festival was held in many parts of Chichibu, but now only in the Hara village.
The young boys collect wood, bamboo and leaves to prepare for a huge ritual bonfire.
The sounds of the huge fire,
パチパチ、パンパン、バリバリ pachi pachi, pan pan, pari pari
The Tengo sama is venerated as Hibuse no Kami 火防の神 Deity to prevent fire, also as the Yama no Kami 山の神 Deity of the Mountain and the pillow of this Tengo is on top of the mountain.
- reference source : navi.city.chichibu.lg.jp -

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There are a few legends about sacred trees where the Tengu sits and takes a rest -
Tengu no matsu 天狗の松, Tengu no koshikake matsu 天狗の腰掛松 .
People protect these trees and dear not cut them down for fear of bad luck and misfortune.
For example in Chichibu town, Higashi-Chichibu, Ogano, ...

Tengu no yasumi no ki 天狗の休み木 A tree where the Tengu takes a rest
Along the pass 烏首峠 Torikubi Toge, which connects 名栗 Naguri with 浦山 Urayama in Chichibu there is 大楓 a huge maple tree where the Tengu takes a rest.
When the forest workers cut it down, there begun a lot of accidents to happen, a wood cutter fell ill and eventually even the man who bought the lumber was hit with bad luck.

. 天狗の腰かけ松 Pine of the Tengu .
Chiba 千葉県, 長生郡 Chosei district 長柄町 Nagara town

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Until the end of WWII, the Tengu were still quite acitve in Chichibu.
At night, people heard the sounds of someone cutting trees in a valley or rolling boulders around a river. When they looked the next morning, all was the same as before ant not one tree felled.
When the Tengu got angry, he would cause fires and make strange noises. Even his horrible laughter could be heard.
The wood workers and fishermen would offer ritual Sake to the Tengu before starting to work.
Once a worker said something bad about the Tengu, but on this day he fell into a ravine and hurt himself.

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At the back of Shrine 和田神社 Wada Jinja was a sanctuary for the 愛宕様 Atago Deity, the 山の神 God of the Mountain.
Once a young man went up there on the 17th night of the second lunar month to meet the Tengu. He saw his huge legs, but could not see the head.

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Tengu-Iwa 天狗岩 and Waterfall


There was a Tengu Boulder near the waterfall 七代の滝 Nanayo no Taki, where a Tengu lived. Once a priest from the nearby temple used it to pee.
If the visitors in his temple wanted to eat Tofu from Tokoy, the Tengu went off to fetch it in no time.

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kawatengu 川天狗 Tengu becoming a River

A huge flood in the region is called Kawa Tengu.
Once during a huge flood the sacred tree for the Tengu was swept away and something red could be seen floating downwriver. Even a huge boulder floating down was split into two, took the shape of two Tengu and was washed away in no time.

- - - - - And a legend from 大滝村 Otaki village
Once a farmer threw his net into the pond at the bottom of the waterfall and caught about 15 trout fish. When he thew his net a second time, be pulled out a sparkle of silver light and a fearful loud voice from the bottom of the pond shouted:
"The first time I forgive you , but a second time is not allowed!"
This time the Kawa Tengu, the River Tengu was angry. (In other legends, the "Kawa Tengu" is seen as a Kappa.)

. kawatengu, kawa-tengu, kawa tengu 川天狗 "river Tengu" .

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東秩父村 Higashi Chichibu

Once upon a time
the Tengu from 武甲山 Mount Bukozan (Bukosan, Mount Buko 1,304 m) and 笠山 Mount Kasayama (837 m) competed about the hight of their mountains.
The Tengu from Bukozan scooped water in a barrel and let it flow toward Kasayama. The angry Tengu from Kasayama took a traveler's hat (kasa 笠), placed it below the barrel and let the water flow back to Bukozan.

Once upon a time
the villagers from 白石 Shiraishi were re-doing a roof with reeds, because when it rained, the roof was leeking. So they kept busy cutting reeds. Just at that time in a nearby farm house, they had just put up reeds for drying. And then - what do you know - in one night all the reeds were over to the neighbour's roof, while they heard strange sounds, ガヤガヤ gayagaya al night.
Next morning the farmer wanted to get his reeds back, but then he realized that only a Tengu could do all that work in one night and returned home in fear.

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倉尾村 Kurao

The Tengu from Kurao
often launch a firework from their rock called 天狗岩 Tenguiwa. But it does not make a sound at all, just beautiful colors like chrysanthemums in the sky.

Once upon a time
a woodworker slipped and fell in a ravine, but a Tengu caught him and helped him.

Once upon a time,
a young man was kidnapped by the Tengu. After three years he came back, but he could do nothing, only blowing the flute.

Once upon a time
a farmer went harvesting rye and took his son with him. But the son was kidnapped by the Tengu. They later found him asleep under a tree, remembering nothing.

Once upon a time
a farmer heard the sound of voices, ホイホイ hoihoi, cutting down a tree. The next morning he found his saw broken.
.
yama no kami 山の神 - Tengu Matsu Pine
Near the Shrine are some trees with abnormal appearance, too thick or very bumpy. They are also called yama no kami no ki 山ノ神の木 "Trees of the Mountain Deity".

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皆野町 Minano

Once a young boy did not come home from school. At night they all went out to search for him they found him on the largest tree, high up in the branches.

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小鹿野町 Ogano

- Tengu no iwa 天狗の岩 Tengu Rock / Tengu boulder
Once upon a time
a skilful fisherman and woodworker lived in the village. One day he forgot to offer ritual Sake to the Tengu before starting to work. He even said something bad about the Tengu.
While he was busy, the sky suddenly turned dark with clouds and rumbling. Then a huge boulder came falling from the sky and burried everything under it, the workers and the lumber - such is the revenge of the Tengu.

Once upon a time
the village temple went out of business and the 釣り鐘 temple bell was given to the pawn shop. It was sold to another village, where soon a fire started. The local fortune teller said it was the temple bell bringing bad luck, so it was given back. This legend is called
Tengu-sama no tsurigane 天狗様の釣り鐘 the Temple bell of the Tengu.

. bonshoo 梵鐘 Bonsho, temple bell - Introduction .

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大滝村 Otaki

tengusama no ki 天狗様の木 The tree of the Tengu
When they cut it down, blood was flowing from the cut.

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両神村 Ryokami village

kamikakushi 神かくし kidnapped !
A little girl of 3 years went to the mountain forest with her mother, but the girl lost her way. She was found 3 days later, more than 4 km away. She must have walked a way impossible to walk for such a yuong girl, so they say she was kidnapped by a Tengu.

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寄居町 Yorii

yama no kami 山の神 - 天狗松 Tengu-Matsu
At the pass toward Higashi-Chichibu village, the Deity of the Mountain is venerated at the Tengu Pine.
But one day the huge tree was to be cut down. But however much they hacked at it, it would not fall. So the workers rested for a while. While they sat down, the tree fell on them all by itself and hurt the workers badly. This was the curse of the Mountain God.


source : choichi.cocolog-nifty.com/blog...
Tengu-Matsu at 牛伏山 Ushibuseyama, Gunma

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吉田町 Yoshida

Once upon a time, it was customary for the local craftsmen to drink a cup of the when they had finished work and were on their way home.
There was one 畳屋 Tatami straw mat maker, who went home without drinking his tea.
After walking for a short while, he heard the sound of cutting wood and it became so dark he could not see the road. Unable to proceed he went back to borrow 提灯 a lantern.
The home owner told him this was the trick of the local Tengu. When he walked back again, it was so light, he almost did not need a lantern.

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- reference : nichibun yokai database 妖怪データベース -

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. Onipedia - 鬼ペディア - Oni Demons - ABC-List - Index - .

- - - - - Chichibu no Oni 秩父の鬼 Demon Legends from Chichibu - - - - -

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東秩父村 Higashi Chichibu

Once an Oni went to the village to catch a human to eat. He shape-shifted into a woman and tried to seduce a man, but the man held on to the branche of a tree and finally escaped.
When the Oni realist his pray was gone, he went right after him. But at the home of the man it smelled like 菖蒲とよもぎ iris and mugwort. The Oni can not stand this smell and run off very fast.
During the celebrations for 端午の節句 Setsubun, the Boy's Festival on March 5 people hang Iris and Mugwort from the eaves of their roofs to ward off the Demons.

. oni wa soto 鬼は外 "Demons, get out!" - Setsubun .

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小鹿野町 Ogano

Once in the deep mountains there lived a strong Oni. Every day he came down to the village and caused trouble, scolding the priest and digging up the fields.
The priest consulted with the cleverest men in the village, about what to do. They found a ruse, telling the Oni that humans were much stronger than he and eventually the Oni left.
(This legend is also told in other villages.)

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Oni yarai 秩父神社の鬼やらい Driving out the Demons at Chichibu Shrine - Setsubun
. Onibabari 鬼払い driving out the demons, .



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秩父の鬼うどん Chichibu no Oni Udon Noodle Restaurant / 定峰峠の鬼うどん
Chichibu District, Higashichichibu, Shiroishi, 333 - Sadamine Toge Pass

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- reference - 秩父 天狗-
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. Tengu 天狗と伝説 Tengu legends "Long-nosed Goblin" .

. - yookai, yōkai 妖怪 Yokai monsters - .

. Legends and Tales from Japan 伝説 - Introduction .

. Mingei 民芸 Regional Folk Art from Japan .

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